Overdose Resources

Opioid Resources

Print resources

The following print resources are available in French and English. Please contact healthsante@ottawa.ca to request copies.

Posters for display at your organization/medical office

  • Anything can be cut with fentanyl
    Anything can be cut with fentanyl
  • Got questions about drugs? (For youth grades 6-8)
    Got questions about drugs? Talk to someone you trust

Postcards for patients/clients

  • Anything can be cut with Fentanyl
    • Front side:
      Anything can be cut with fentanyl
    • Back side:
      Know the signs and symptoms of an opioid overdose
  • Party n' Play Postcard
    • Front:
      Into chemsex or party n' play?
    • Back:
      Signs and symptoms of an opoiod overdose

Parenting in Ottawa resource for parents

  • Where to get tips and resources about speaking to your kids about drugsYou are your kid's first line of defense against drugs
Other Resources 

Information for Pharmacists 

Naloxone Distribution

Pharmacists are highly respected as the medication management experts of the health care team. By becoming a participant in the Ontario Naloxone Program for Pharmacies (ONPP), your pharmacy can increase access to naloxone and be part of the enhanced response to overdose prevention in our community.  For more information on how to participate in the ONPP, please see this notice from the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care 

Used Medication Disposal at Pharmacies

Pharmacies play a fundamental role in raising awareness about the importance of properly disposing of unused or expired medications by providing a drop-off locations for such medications as over-the-counter, prescription and natural health products through Health Products Stewardship Associations' (HPSA) Medications Return Program (OMRP), and for sharps materials and devices through its Sharps Collection Program (OSCP).

  • Ottawa Public Health (OPH) is working in partnership with the Health Products Stewardship Association (HPSA) to raise public awareness of the importance of safe disposal of unused or expired medications. Success depends on participating pharmacies being informed about the procedures, guidelines and regulations of the Ontario Medications Return program (OMRP),  and actively offering the collection and management of unused or expired medications returned by the public. 
  • You can call the HPSA to register your location at 613-723-7282 or send an email to info@healthsteward.ca. The OMRP covers the costs associated with the responsible disposal of health products returned by the public. There is no cost to you.
  • If you would like to receive FREE copies of the Take it Back! public rack cards, pictured below, you may use the order form, or call or email the Health Products Stewardship Association to receive copies.  They will be happy to send you English and /or French copies, free of charge, to your pharmacy location(s).
  • Please find a list of products that are accepted and not accepted through the Ontario Medications Return Program. Your  pharmacy clients will be able to find the closest participating pharmacies to their  location through the HPSA website homepage by typing in their postal  code or address.

Ottawa Public Health Opioid Email Updates

You can also join the distribution list for Ottawa Public Health Opioid Updates for communications regarding overdose prevention and naloxone programming.  To register for the list please email jackie.kay-lepors@ottawa.ca

For all other inquiries please contact  the Ottawa Public Health Information Line at healthsante@ottawa.ca or call  613-580-6744 ( TTY: 613-580-9656, Toll free: 1-866-426-8885) Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm (closed on statutory holidays).

Information for Festival Organizers 

Party safe banner. People jumping up at a concert

The 2018 Festival Season is here and Ottawa Public Health (OPH) would like to assist you in reducing the risk of accidental overdoses at your event.

Ottawa Public Health's free training for festival organizers

Ottawa Public Health and the Sexual Assault Network can support your summer festival and events by providing a free training to security staff, first aid staff, volunteers and festival organizers.

The training can include all or some of the information below. You can make the training your own!

  • Naloxone training
  • Cannabis, including proposed laws and health risks
  • Alcohol and energy drinks
  • Sexual assault prevention
  • Opioids, including how to recognize and respond to an overdose

Call 613-580-6744 to book a free training session for your festival

Where can I get Naloxone?

  • Call 613-580-6744 and OPH can connect you with pharmacists to purchase Naloxone kits and training
  • StopOverdoseOttawa.ca has a list of participating pharmacies. Call your pharmacy to make sure they have naloxone on hand.

What can festival organizers do to increase safety?

As a festival organizer, there are actions you can take to decrease the risk of overdoses and other drug related harms at your events.
  1. Call 613-580-6744 to book a free harm reduction training for staff and volunteers.
  2. Add StopOverdoseOttawa.ca to your website, social media and email messaging to festival goers
  3. Share Party Safe messages with your staff, volunteers, attendees on social media
  4. Post resources such as "Anything can be cut with fentanyl" posters and "Signs & Symptoms of Overdose"
  5. Allow attendees to bring naloxone kits onsite
  6. Ensure naloxone trained staff are onsite
  7. Create Policies:
    • Intoxication policies and procedures (ID check, smart serve training)
    • Have low cost non-alcoholic drinks
    • Access to first aid, security and volunteers
    • Reduce risks i.e. lighting, hazards, crowd control
    • Position toilets and health facilities in accessible and well lit areas
    • Provide free water

   8. Encourage staff and volunteers to watch our informative videos that provide an overview of opioids, overdoses and naloxone.

Resources

Ottawa Public Health, along with the Ottawa Overdose Prevention Task Force launched this website where you can find more information on drugs and overdoses.

For more ideas and information on planning a safe event, please visit:

Drug Use and Overdose Statistics

Drug use may result in acute effects such as overdose (poisoning) or mental and behavioural effects (e.g., the “bad trip” or withdrawal).  Chronic use may cause other adverse health consequences.

This section discusses the use of, and resulting acute morbidity and mortality from, drugs other than cannabis, alcohol and tobacco. For additional information on drugs please refer to Ottawa Public Health's Stop Overdose webpage. Information on cannabis, alcohol and tobacco use in Ottawa can be accessed on the following Ottawa Public Health data pages: 

Opioid Overdose Surveillance Data

Opioid Overdose Emergency Department Visit Count by Month (Updated Monthly)

Figure 1. Opioid overdose emergency department visit count by month in Ottawa, 2017 to 2018

Line graph of the monthly count of emergency department visits at Ottawa hospitals for patients diagnosed with an opioid overdose/poisoning.

 Data Source and Notes for Figure 1

National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS), Canadian Institute for Health (CIHI)

  • This data is specific to opioids and so counts will be lower than counts of suspected overdose related emergency department visits.
  • Opioid overdose visits include unscheduled emergency department visits where opioid poisoning was recorded as the main or other problem. Unconfirmed diagnoses are excluded.
  • Counts include all patients with an opioid overdose who are seen at Ottawa hospital emergency departments regardless of the patient's place of residence. Patients who reside outside of Ottawa and are seen at Ottawa hospitals are included.
  • Counts include all overdoses, regardless of the intent of the person who overdosed.
  • Cases include all ages and all levels of severity.
  • Counts are preliminary and may change over time as data is updated.
  • This data is not specific to the type of opioid (e.g. heroin or fentanyl) or the circumstances of it's use (therapeutic, recreational etc.).
  • Monthly counts of less than 5 will be suppressed for privacy purposes.
  • View data below or on OpenData Ottawa
Data Tables for Figure 1
Table 1A. Opioid overdose emergency department visit count by month in 2018, Ottawa

Month (2018)

Total ED visits for opioid overdose

January

28

February

30

March

29

April

22

May

33

June

38

July

48

August

46

September

50

October 24
November 32
Table 1B. Opioid overdose emergency department visit count by month in 2017, Ottawa

Month (2017)

Total ED visits for opioid overdose

April

38

May

24

June

37

July

50

Aug

48

Sep

41

Oct

33

Nov

27

Dec

29

 

Supervised Consumption Site Data

Supervised Consumption Site Data
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 Drug Checking Results

Sandy Hill Community Health Centre posts results of its drug checking that is conducted through mass spectrometry based drug analysis (SIS clients only).

Monthly results are posted online on their website. 

Drug Use and Health Impacts Data

Drug use can result in poisonings (overdoses) or mental health related emergency department visits, hospitalizations or deaths. Opioids, in particular, have received a great deal of attention in the last few years as the effects of their use become more evident.

Self-Reported Drug Use Among Ottawa Adults
  • An estimated 3% of the Ottawa population aged 19 and over reported using an illicit drug other than cannabis in the past year. [1]  This is not different from Ontario-less-Ottawa. Estimates cannot be made for individual drugs because of small counts. Self reports likely underestimate drug use due to the stigmatic and illegal nature of many of these drugs. 
Self-Reported Substance Use Among Ottawa Youth in the Past Year

In Ottawa:

  • Approximately 10% of students in Grades 7 to 12 use cough and cold medicine, opioids or other illicit substances. This is less common that alcohol or cannabis (Figure 2). 
  • More than 6,100 (14%) Grade 9 to 12 students used prescription medication (e.g., opioids, tranquilizers, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medications) non-medically.  This is not different from Ontario-less-Ottawa. Non-medical opioid use was reported by approximately 4,800 (11%) Grade 9 to 12 students. [2]
  • About one in ten (9%) Grade 9 to 12 students reported using a substance other than alcohol, cannabis, prescription, or over-the-counter (OTC) medication (e.g., hallucinogens, cocaine, or ecstasy). [2]

Figure 2. Reported use of selected substances by Ottawa students in the past year, 2017

Figure 2. Reported use of selected substances by Ottawa students in the past year, 2017

 Data Source and Notes for Figure 2

Ottawa Public Health. Public Health Monitoring of Risk Factors in Ontario – Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey 2017. Centre for Addictions and Mental Health

  • The 2017 OSDUHS data used in this section are from the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey conducted by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and administered by the Institute for Social Research, York University. Its contents and interpretation are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.
  • The Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) is the longest ongoing biennial school survey in Canada, and the only province-wide survey of this population. The 2017 statistics are based on a random representative sample of over 1,400 Ottawa students enrolled in any of the four publicly funded school boards in grades 7 through 12.
 Data Table for Figure 2

Table 2. Reported use (% of Ottawa students) in the past year for selected substances, 2017
Substance Percentage of Student Reporting Use
Alcohol 35.9
Cannabis 18.0
Non medical opioids (Gr 7-8) 8.6
Non medical opioids (Gr 9-12) 11.3
Cough/cold medicine 9.4
Tobacco 5.8
Illicit drug use (Gr 9-12) 9.9
Emergency Department Visits for Drug Use

In Ottawa:

  • Unintentional opioid drug overdose emergency department visits exceed overdoses from all other drugs combined (e.g., cocaine, barbiturates and amphetamines). Opioid overdoses have increased markedly since 2015 (Figure 3).
  • Young adults have the highest rates of unintentional opioid overdose emergency department visits, peaking in the 30 to 34 year age group (Figure 4).

Figure 3. Emergency department visits for unintentional opioid and non-opioid drug related overdoses in Ottawa from 2008 to 2017

 A line graph showing the count of emergency department visits for unintentional opioid and non-opioid drug overdoses in Ottawa from 2008 to 2017

 Data Source and Notes for Figure 3

Unscheduled emergency department visits, National Ambulatory Care System (2008-2017). Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHealth Ontario. Extracted Oct 2, 2018

  • Data includes poisonings from opioids (T400, T401, T402, T403, T404 and T406) and non-opioid drug poisonings (T405, T408, T423, T409 and T436).
  • Data excludes intentional events (X61, X62 and Y87) and those related to cannabis overdoses (T407).
  • Data includes patients with Ottawa as their public health unit of residence.
  • For clarity, rates are not graphed, but are provided in the accompanying data table.
 Data Table for Figure 3
 
Table 3. Emergency department visits for unintentional opioid and non-opioid drug related overdoses in Ottawa from 2008 to 2017
Year All Opioid Overdoses Counts Non-Opioid Overdoses Counts Population Opioid Overdose Rates (per 100,000 population) Non-Opioid Overdoses Rates (per 100,000 population)
2008 103 63 869,015 11.9 7.2
2009 104 61 883,741 11.8 6.9
2010 128 62 899,016 14.2 6.9
2011 138 72 912,248 15.1 7.9
2012 153 68 924,466 16.6 7.4
2013 198 82 936,180 21.1 8.8
2014 196 87 946,870 20.7 9.2
2015 178 94 956,929 18.6 9.8
2016 243 115 973,481 25 11.8
2017 370 122 996,651 37.1 12.2

Figure 4. Emergency department visit rates (counts per 100,000 population) for unintentional opioid overdose by age group in Ottawa, 2017 A bar graph showing the count of emergency department visits for unintentional opioid overdoses in Ottawa by age group in 2017

 Data Sources and Notes for Figure 4

Unscheduled emergency department visits, National Ambulatory Care System (2017). Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHealth Ontario. Extracted Oct 2, 2018

  • Data includes unintentional poisonings from opioids (T400, T401, T402, T403, T404 and T406) and non-opioid drug poisonings (T405, T408, T423, T409 and T436).
  • Data excludes intentional events (X61, X62 and Y87) and those related to cannabis overdoses (T407).
  • Data includes patients with Ottawa as their public health unit of residence.
 Data Table for Figure 4
Table 4. Emergency department visit rates (counts per 100,000 population) for unintentional opioid overdose by age group in Ottawa, 2017
Age Group (in Years) Opioid Overdose Rate (per 100,000 population)
Less than 1  No cases
1 to 4  No cases
5 to 9  No cases
10 to 14 5.8
15 to 19 40.5
20 to 24 55.5
25 to 29 71.7
30 to 34 83.4
35 to 39 50.1
40 to 44 33.5
45 to 49 51.5
50 to 54 32.1
55 to 59 37
60 to 64 27.1
65 and Older 17.2
  • A different pattern is seen when looking at drug-related emergency department visits for mental and behavioural disorders in Ottawa (Figure 5, Table 6). Non-opioid related mental and behavioural disorder emergency department visits exceed those of opioids and show an increasing trend beginning in 2015 (Figure 5). 

Figure 5. Emergency department drug-related mental and behavioural disorder visits in Ottawa from 2008 to 2017

 A line graph showing the count of emergency department visits for drug-related mental and behavioural disorders in Ottawa from 2008 to 2017

 Data Source and Notes for Figure 5

Unscheduled emergency department visits, National Ambulatory Care System (2008-2017). Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHealth Ontario. Extracted Oct 2, 2018

  • Data includes mental and behavioural disorders for opioids (F110-F119) and non-opioids (F130-139, F140-149, F150-159, F160-169, F180-F189 and F190-F199).
  • Data excludes intentional events (X61, X62 and Y87) and those related to cannabis (F120-129).  
  • Data includes patients with Ottawa as their public health unit of residence.
  • Rates are not graphed for clarity, but are provided in the accompanying data table.
 Data Table for Figure 5
Table 5. Emergency department drug related mental and behavioural disorder visits and rates as counts per 100,000 population in Ottawa from 2008 to 2017
Year All opioid mental disorder counts Non-opioid mental disorder counts  Opioid mental disorder rate Non-opioid mental disorder rate 
2008 209 1029 24.1 118.4
2009 229 879 25.9 99.5
2010 345 1014 38.4 112.8
2011 312 1005 34.2 110.2
2012 295 1008 31.9 109
2013 230 926 24.6 98.9
2014 236 1058 24.9 111.7
2015 285 1148 29.8 120
2016 294 1487 30.2 152.8
2017 395 1714 39.6 172.0

 

Table 6. Number of mental and behavioural disorder emergency department visits in Ottawa by drug type, 2017
Drug Type Number of emergency department visits
Multiple drug use 947
Cocaine 537
Opioids 395
Stimulants 209
Hypnotics 97
Hallucinogens 21
Solvents Less than 10 visits
 Data Source and Notes for Table 6

Unscheduled emergency department visits, National Ambulatory Care System (2008-2017). Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHealth Ontario. Extracted Oct 2, 2018

  • Data includes mental and behavioural disorders for opioids (F110-F119) and non-opioids (F130-139, F140-149, F150-159, F160-169, F180-F189 and F190-F199).
  • Data excludes intentional events (X61, X62 and Y87) and those related to cannabis (F120-129).  
  • Data includes patients with Ottawa as their public health unit of residence.
  • Rates are not graphed for clarity, but are provided in the accompanying data table.

 

Hospitalizations for Drug Use

In Ottawa:

  • Unintentional opioid drug overdose hospitalizations exceeded overdoses from all other drugs combined (e.g., cocaine, barbiturates, amphetamines) (Figure 6).
  • Adults aged 65 and older have the highest rates of unintentional opioid overdose hospitalizations (Figure 7).  This group also has the highest rate of opioid prescription for pain (Figure 8).

Figure 6. Hospitalizations for unintentional drug related overdoses in Ottawa from 2008 to 2017

A line graph showing the count of hospitalizations for unintentional opioid and non-opioid drug overdoses in Ottawa from 2008 to 2017

 Data Source and Notes for Figure 6

Unscheduled hospitalizations, Discharge Abstract Database (2008-2017). Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHealth Ontario. Extracted Oct 2, 2018

  • Data includes poisonings from opioids (T400, T401, T402, T403, T404 and T406) and non-opioid drug poisonings (T405, T408, T423, T409 and T436).
  • Data excludes intentional events (X61, X62 and Y87) and those related to cannabis overdoses (T407).
  • Data includes visits with Ottawa as the public health unit of the patient.
  • Rates are not graphed for clarity, but are provided in the accompanying data table
 Data Table for Figure 6
 
Table 7. Hospitalization counts and rates (per 100,000 population) for opioid and non-opioid overdoses
Year Hospitalization counts for opioids Hospitalization counts for non-opioids Hospitalization rates for opioids Hospitalization rates for non-opioids
2008 32 16 3.7 1.8
2009 33 12 3.7 1.4
2010 15 13 1.7 1.4
2011 43 9 4.7 1
2012 45 15 4.9 1.6
2013 45 11 4.8 1.2
2014 55 23 5.8 2.4
2015 44 18 4.6 1.9
2016 64 22 6.6 2.3
2017 67 33 6.7 3.3

Figure 7. Hospitalization rates (counts per 100,000 population) for unintentional opioid overdose by age group in Ottawa, 2017

 A bar graph showing the rate of hospitalizations for unintentional opioid and non-opioid drug overdoses in Ottawa by age group in 2017

 Data Source and Notes for Figure 7

Unscheduled hospitalizations, Discharge Abstract Database (2008-2017). Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHealth Ontario. Extracted Oct 2, 2018

  • Data includes poisonings from opioids (T400, T401, T402, T403, T404 and T406) and non-opioid drug poisonings (T405, T408, T423, T409 and T436).
  • Data excludes intentional events (X61, X62 and Y87) and those related to cannabis overdoses (T407).
  • Data includes visits with Ottawa as the public health unit of the patient.
  • Rates for those aged 0 to 19 are suppressed due to low counts.
 Data Table for Figure 7
 
Table 8. Hospitalization rates (counts per 100,000 population) for unintentional opioid overdose by age group in Ottawa, 2017
Age Group (in Years)  Hospitalization Rate (per 100,000 population)
0 to 19 Not reportable
20 to 29 7
30 to 39 7
40 to 49 9.1
50 to 64 7
65 and older 12.6

Figure 8. Prescription rates as counts per 1,000 population for opioid prescriptions for pain by age group in Ottawa, 2017

A bar graph showing the rate of opioid prescriptions for pain by age group in Ottawa, 2017

 Data Source and Notes for Figure 8

Ontario Drug Policy Research Network. Ontario Prescription Opioid Tool. Toronto, ON; July 2018. Available from: http://odprn.ca/ontario-opioid-drug-observatory/ontario-prescription-opioid-tool/  [Extracted Oct 2, 2018]

 Data Table for Figure 8

 

Table 9. Individual prescription rates as counts per 1,000 population for opioid prescriptions for pain by age group in Ottawa, 2017
Age Group (in Years) Prescription Rate (per 100,000 population)
0 to 14 10.4
15 to 24 71.6
25 to 44 75.6
45 to 64 130.2
65 and older 197.6
  • Although non-opioid mental health and behavioural hospitalizations exceed those that are opioid-related, this difference has narrowed in recent years (Figure 9).
  • Table 11 shows the mental and behavioural disorder hospitalizations by drug type.

Figure 9. Opioid and non-opioid related mental and behavioural disorder hospitalizations in Ottawa from 2008 to 2017

]: A line graph showing the count of hospitalizations for opioid and non-opioid related mental and behavioural disorders in Ottawa from 2008 to 2017

 Data Source and Notes for Figure 9

Unscheduled hospitalizations, Discharge Abstract Database (2008-2017). Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHealth Ontario. Extracted Oct 2, 2018

  • Data includes mental and behavioural disorders for opioids (F110-F119) and non-opioids (F130-139, F140-149, F150-159, F160-169, F180-F189 and F190-F199).

  • Data excludes intentional events (X61, X62 and Y87) and those related to cannabis (F120-129). 

  • Data includes patients with Ottawa as their public health unit of residence.

  • Rates are not graphed for clarity, but are provided in the accompanying data table.

 Data Table for Figure 9

Table 10. Opioid and non-opioid related mental and behavioural disorder hospitalizations in Ottawa from 2008 to 2017
Year All Opioid Mental Disorder Counts Non-Opioid Mental Disorder Counts  Opioid Mental Disorder Rate Non-Opioid Mental Disorder Rate
2008 85 216 9.8 24.9
2009 97 214 11 24.2
2010 104 214 11.6 23.8
2011 95 188 10.4 20.6
2012 103 189 11.1 20.4
2013 103 171 11 18.3
2014 138 177 14.6 18.7
2015 131 166 13.7 17.3
2016 176 228 18.1 23.4
2017 211 242 21.2 24.3
Table 11. Number of mental and behavioural disorder hospitalizations in Ottawa by drug type, 2017
Drug Type Number of hospitalizations
Opioids 211
Cocaine 137
Multiple drug use 104
Hypnotics 26
Stimulants 25
Hallucinogens <10
Solvents <10
 Data Source and Notes for Table 11
Unscheduled hospitalizations, Discharge Abstract Database (2008-2017). Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHealth Ontario. Extracted Oct 2, 2018
  • Data includes mental and behavioural disorders for opioids (F110-F119) and non-opioids (F130-139, F140-149, F150-159, F160-169, F180-F189 and F190-F199).

  • Data excludes intentional events (X61, X62 and Y87) and those related to cannabis (F120-129). 

  • Data includes patients with Ottawa as their public health unit of residence.

  • Rates are not graphed for clarity, but are provided in the accompanying data table.

Fatalities and Drug Overdoses in Ottawa

Unintentional Drug Overdose Deaths

  • In 2016, there were 45 deaths associated with unintentional drug overdoses, including overdoses where intent was unknown. The majority of these deaths (37, 82%) were opioid related (Figure 10).
  • Figure 11 shows the age distribution of unintentional drug overdose deaths in Ottawa in 2016.
  • The rate of drug overdose deaths increased 32% in Ottawa between 2014 and 2015 and only 6% in the rest of Ontario (Figure 12). The increase in unintentional overdose deaths in Ottawa and the rest of Ontario has been due to increased unintentional opioid overdose deaths (Figure 12).
  • Since 2014, fentanyl has been involved in the largest proportion of drug overdose deaths in Ottawa. For more information see the "Drug-related death in Ottawa, 2000-2015" report. 

Figure 10. Unintentional drug overdose deaths in Ottawa by type of drug involved, 2016

A stacked bar graph showing the count of unintentional overdose deaths by type of drug in Ottawa in 2016

 Data Source and Notes for Figure 10

Office of the Chief Coroner for Ontario, extracted April 2018. Analyzed by Epidemiology Team, Ottawa Public Health.

  • Data includes overdoses that were unintentional or of unknown intent. Data should be considered preliminary. Data includes people with Ottawa as their public health unit of residence.
 Data Table for Figure 10

Table 12. Unintentional drug overdose deaths in Ottawa by type of drug involved, 2016
Drug type Number of deaths
Fentanyl 18
Non-fentanyl opioids 19
All opioids 37
Non-opioid  8
Total 45

Figure 11. Age distribution of unintentional drug overdose deaths in Ottawa, 2016 (45 deaths total)

A horizontal bar graph showing the count of overdose deaths in Ottawa in 2016 by age group.

 Data Source and Notes for Figure 11
Office of the Chief Coroner for Ontario, extracted April 2018. Analyzed by Epidemiology Team, Ottawa Public Health.
 Data Table for Figure 11
Table 13. Age distribution of Ottawa unintentional drug overdose deaths, 2016 (45 deaths total)
Age Group Number of Unintentional Drug Overdose Deaths
0 to 9 Years 0
10 to 19 Years 1
20 to 29 Years 8
30 to 39 Years 14
40 to 49 Years 11
50 to 59 Years 8
60 Years and Older 3

Opioid-Related Overdose Deaths

Total opioid overdose deaths include those that are unintentional, intentional (suicide) or of unknown intent.

  • There were a total of 64 opioid overdose deaths in 2017, an increase from 40 opioid overdose deaths in 2016 (Figure 12). The increase in opioid-related deaths is consistent with the trend seen in emergency room visits and hospitalizations: opioid-related harms have been increasing over the past few years (Figure 12).
  • The mortality rate resulting from opioid use was highest in the 45 to 64 year old age group in 2017 (Figure 13).
  • Fentanyl was the single most common opioid implicated in unintentional opioid-related overdose deaths in 2016 (Figure 10). In 2017, fentanyl was responsible for 72% of all-intent opioid related deaths (46 of 64). [4]

Figure 12. Total opioid overdose deaths in Ottawa and rates per 100,000 population, 2008 to 2017

 A line graph superimposed over a bar graph showing the count of all-intent opioid overdose deaths in Ottawa in 2008 to 2017.

 Data Source and Notes for Figure 12

Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario). Interactive Opioid Tool. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario; 2018. Available from: http://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/DataAndAnalytics/Opioids/Opioids.aspx

  • Data includes all opioid overdoses and people with Ottawa as their public health unit of residence.

 Data Table for Figure 12

Table 14. Total opioid overdose deaths in Ottawa from 2008 to 2017
Year Count of deaths Rate of deaths
2008 14 1.6
2009 34 3.8
2010 22 2.4
2011 20 2.2
2012 19 2.1
2013 29 3.1
2014 30 3.2
2015 34 3.6
2016 40 4.1
2017 64 6.4

Figure 13. Total opioid overdose related deaths by age group and rates as counts per 100,000 population in Ottawa, 2017

 A line graph superimposed over a bar graph showing the count of all-intent opioid overdose deaths in Ottawa in 2008 to 2017

 Data Source and Notes for Figure 13

Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario). Interactive Opioid Tool. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario; 2018. Available from: http://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/DataAndAnalytics/Opioids/Opioids.aspx

  • Data includes all opioid overdoses and people with Ottawa as their public health unit of residence.
  • The rates by age for a single year should be interpreted with caution because of low counts in some age groups.  
 Data Table for Figure 13
 
Table 15. Total opioid overdose related deaths by age group and rates as counts per 100,000 population in Ottawa, 2017
Age Group (in Years) Count of Deaths Rate of Deaths (per 100,000 population)
0 to 14 1 0.6
15 to 24 7 5.4
25 to 44 25 8.6
45 to 64 28 10.5
65 and Older 3 2

Drug Use and Overdose Reports

Emergency Department Visits for Drug Overdoses in Ottawa, Archived Reports from 2017

Picture of report on emergency department visits for drug overdoses in Ottawa

Problematic Substance Use in Ottawa, 2016

This report focuses on the prevalence of use, and the associated morbidity and mortality from the problematic use of illicit drugs, excluding cannabis, and of opioid prescription drugs used for non-medical purposes.

Problematic Substance Use in Ottawa - Technical Report [PDF 2.5 MB]

Drug Overdose Deaths in Ottawa, 2000-2015
Report: Drug Overdose Deaths in Ottawa, 2000-2015 [PDF 834 KB]
Overdose and HIV and Hepatitis C Infection Among People in Ottawa who use Drugs, 2014

This report provides epidemiologic information about the risk of overdose and HIV and HCV infection among people who use drugs.

Overdose and HIV and hepatitis C infection among people in Ottawa who use drugs - 2014 [PDF 369 KB]

Ottawa Student Drug Use and Health (OSDUH) Report, 2014

The Ottawa Student Drug Use and Health Report 2014 offers a snapshot of health risk behaviours among youth in Ottawa using data from the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS).

Full report [PDF 875 KB]
Infographics:

Substance Misuse in Ottawa, 2013 
This report focuses on the prevalence of substance use and the attributed burden of mental health, addictions, injury and chronic disease in Ottawa. It is meant to inform an evidence-based dialogue in our community to foster effective health prevention, promotion and interventions related to substance misuse.

Substance Misuse in Ottawa Report [PDF 887 KB.]

External Links

Opioid-Related Morbidity and Mortality in Ontario
The Interactive Opioid Tool allows users to explore the most recent opioid-related morbidity and mortality data including emergency department visits, hospitalizations and deaths. Results can be viewed by public health unit, local health integration network, age, sex, and in some cases, drug type.

References

References
  1. Ottawa Public Health. Canadian Community Health Survey 2015/16. Ontario Share File. Statistics Canada.
  2. Ottawa Public Health. Public Health Monitoring of Risk Factors in Ontario – Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey 2017. Centre for Addictions and Mental Health
  3. Office of the Chief Coroner for Ontario. [Extracted April 2018]
  4. Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario). Interactive Opioid Tool. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario; 2018. Available from: http://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/DataAndAnalytics/Opioids/Opioids.aspx

 

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