For everyone

1 in 5 Canadians will experience a mental health problem or illness in any given year. 

It could be you or someone you know and care about. To learn more about how we can all promote positive mental health, check out these 5 videos for the general population and 2 new videos for diverse populations. The video series is accompanied by an activity guide to help keep the conversation going and take action on mental health.

Are You New to Canada?   New 

Coming to a new country can be both exciting and challenging.  Newcomers experience many changes at the same time including changes in family structure, social networks, and surrounding environment.  As a result, the process of adapting to a new country can be stressful. While you are adjusting to your new home, the video below provides few strategies to take care of yourself and your mental health. 

For information on mental health and mental illnesses, check out the listing of Mental Health and Addiction Services in Ottawa and www.multiculturalmentalhealth.ca 

 Transcript
Did you know that almost 22% of Canadians were born outside of Canada? That is 1 in 5 Canadians.

So, many people who live here have come from somewhere else.  Moving to a new country can be exciting.

Visiting new places, meeting new people and seeing new things can be fun. 

At the same time, adjusting to a new climate, culture and language, finding a job, a place to live and making new friends can be difficult. 

And for some people who are coming from unsafe parts of the world, you may face greater challenges like having bad dreams, anger, losing sleep, not eating well, and feeling tired.  You might even feel these things in your body, like having a stomach-ache.  This can make the process of settling in more difficult. 

Feeling a sense of loss, missing your home, feeling like you don`t fit in, or dealing with past trauma, can also be part of settling into a new country.  And some people may even experience discrimination.

It is important to know you are not alone! Many people feel like this and have lived through the same experience. 

So, what has helped them get through it?  Let’s look at an example…

This is Abdul.

Abdul moved to Canada six months ago with his wife and two children.  Although Abdul is happy in his new home, getting used to many new things at once is overwhelming. 

He sometimes feels upset and frustrated because he feels he should know everything. He is trying to find work and support his children in their new school and community. 

Other times he is sad and lonely because he misses his previous home, friends and family.

Although many newcomers feel this way, there are helpful things Abdul can do. 

Getting used to a new way of life is not easy.  It takes time and that is ok. 

Abdul can think about things that has helped him feel better in the past.  He knows that

  • Spending time with family and friends,
  • praying, and
  • playing sports  

Have helped him feel better.

You might be feeling like Abdul, sad, disappointed and missing home.  These feelings can be part of adjusting to a new country and home.  However, if these feelings continue, you can talk to a health professional or someone you trust. 

It can be very helpful.  Talking to someone about your challenges and feelings can help you feel better mentally and physically.

So, let’s review…What are some things you can do?

  • Remember what helped you feel better in the past
  • Focus on the positive and the things you can control
  • Meet with people from your community or your country of origin
  • Call 211 to find programs and services available to newcomers in your city and community
  • Talk to someone you trust.  It can be a family member, a friend, a religious/community leader or a health professional.
  • You are not alone.  Get help when you need it.

Like Abdul, we all need a little help sometime.  Asking for help is not a sign of weakness.  It is a sign of courage!  As much as we are able to offer help to others, it is ok to seek and accept help when we need it.  

What would help you to adapt to your new home? 

How could you help someone you know adapt to living in a new country? 

It can be something as small as cooking a meal for someone or helping a neighbor shovel snow.

Write down your ideas so you can go back to them when you need them. 

Try it out and see how it goes!  If it is not perfect, that is ok.  Try something else. 

It is amazing how small changes can make a big difference. 

You won’t know unless you try!  

For more information on mental health for newcomers and diverse communities, check out  Settlement.org and www.multiculturalmentalhealth.ca

For more information and resources on mental health and mental illnesses …and when and where to get help…. check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Brought to you by Ottawa Public Health.

 Activity Guide - Coming Soon
 

 

Workshops: Promoting Positive Mental Health
In order to support you to promote positive mental health, Ottawa Public Health will be offering four workshops in English in 2019, for staff workers, students, volunteers who work with community residents. All workshops will be held in the afternoon.

 

  • Wednesday, April 4th :  Promoting Immigrant and Ethno-Cultural Mental Health
    • A workshop presenting the new videos and Activity Guide of the “have THAT talk” campaign promoting positive mental health with the Immigrant and Ethno-Cultural populations.

 

  • Wednesday, June 19th: safeTALK
    • Participants will learn four basic steps to recognize persons with thoughts of suicide and connect them with suicide helping resources. This three-hour training can help you make a difference.

 

  • Tuesday, November 26th: Promoting Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (IECMH)
    • Infants and young children have mental health. It is also important to recognize that brain development begins in pregnancy. This workshop will provide support and information to professionals when they have the conversation about IECMH and its interrelated components.

 

We appreciate you sharing this invitation with your networks, partners and co-workers.  If you would like to be added to our distribution list and receive updated information, please let us know via mentalhealthteam@ottawa.ca.   For more information, please contact Carole Legault at 613-580-6744, extension 23664. 

Veuillez noter que ces ateliers sont aussi offerts en français.  Pour vous inscrire ou pour plus d’information, veuillez communiquer avec Carole Legault au 613-580-6744, poste 23664 ou par courriel à carole.legault@ottawa.ca

Mental Health = Health (diverse populations)  New 

There are specific cultural influences and beliefs about mental health and mental illness.  People’s interpretation and understanding of these concepts ultimately affect how people view mental health and mental illness.  This is often the basis for many of the misconceptions and stigma surrounding this health issue.  This Mental Health=Health video aims to discuss various cultural understandings and myths about stigma, mental health and illness, and identify factors that promote and protect mental health and build resiliency.  

For information on mental health and mental illnesses, check out the listing of Mental Health and Addiction Services in Ottawa and www.multiculturalmentalhealth.ca 

 Transcript

Have you asked yourself what is mental health?

It is not about being happy all the time or the absence of illness

Mental health is being able to feel, think, and act in ways that help us enjoy life and cope with the challenges we face.  

As our life experiences and circumstances change, so can our moods, thoughts, and sense of well-being. 

Many things can effect our mental health in a positive or negative way.  Stressful life situations, adjusting to life in a new country, living through violence, trauma, loss, discrimination and racism are some things that can negatively effect our mental health 

So, what is the difference between mental health and mental illness?

Well, mental illness is a medical diagnosis given by a doctor just like other illness like diabetes. And like diabetes, medications, supports and treatments such as counselling can help someone get better. 

Mental illness can affect people of all ages, gender, education, income levels, and cultures.

However, due to myths and misunderstandings, some people believe that:

  • mental illness is a personal weakness;
  • a curse or punishment from God or;
  • is caused by the devil or evil spirts

This can result in labeling the person, especially when they are perceived as different or described as crazy or psycho. 

Because of these negative beliefs and myths, people with mental illness are treated poorly and face stigma.

So what is stigma?

Stigma is a set of negative beliefs, attitudes and behaviors towards a group of people. 

Stigma exists in every community and in some communities stigma can be so hurtful that it effects work, education, family, marriage and other prospects for the person living with a mental illness and their family.

Stigma can also stop people from being accepted by their family, friends, community, and it can stop them from getting the help they need.

When people living with a mental illness are supported and get the help they need, they can have good mental health.   

Let us look at an example.

This is Mei,

Mei’s family moved to Canada when she was 10 years old.   Lately, she feels sad and does not feel happy doing the things she used to enjoy.  She feels stressed because her parents and teachers expect a lot from her.  She struggles living with one culture at home and another one at school and work.  She does not think her family will understand what she is going through. 

Luckily, Mei is close to her aunt Hong who notices these changes and asks her how she is doing.  She feels relieved that she can talk to someone.  Hong listens to her and together, they write down things Mei can do to feel better like:

  • remembering what helped her in the past;
  • thinking of things she is grateful for;
  • writing down her feelings before she talks to her parents and;
  • speaking to a counsellor at school

Like Mei, we all have days when we do not feel our best.  If you continue to not feel well, it is important to speak with a health professional just like you would if you do not feel well physically. Taking care of your mental health is just as important as taking care of your physical health. 

Write down one thing you can do to stay mentally healthy like:

  • Remembering what helped you deal with stress in the past
  • Making  time for yourself, praying or reflecting on what you are thankful for
  • Reaching out for help from family, friends,  community leaders or health professionals and
  • Getting help early

For more information on mental health for newcomers and diverse communities, check out  Settlement.org and www.multiculturalmentalhealth.ca

For more information and resources on mental health and mental illnesses and when and where to get help,  Visit haveTHATtalk.ca to learn more

Brought to you by Ottawa Public Health

 Activity Guide - Coming Soon
 

 

 Workshops: Promoting Positive Mental Health

In order to support you to promote positive mental health, Ottawa Public Health will be offering four workshops in English in 2019, for staff workers, students, volunteers who work with community residents. All workshops will be held in the afternoon.

 

  • Wednesday, April 4th :  Promoting Immigrant and Ethno-Cultural Mental Health
    • A workshop presenting the new videos and Activity Guide of the “have THAT talk” campaign promoting positive mental health with the Immigrant and Ethno-Cultural populations.

 

  • Wednesday, June 19th: safeTALK
    • Participants will learn four basic steps to recognize persons with thoughts of suicide and connect them with suicide helping resources. This three-hour training can help you make a difference.

 

  • Tuesday, November 26th: Promoting Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (IECMH)
    • Infants and young children have mental health. It is also important to recognize that brain development begins in pregnancy. This workshop will provide support and information to professionals when they have the conversation about IECMH and its interrelated components.

 

We appreciate you sharing this invitation with your networks, partners and co-workers.  If you would like to be added to our distribution list and receive updated information, please let us know via mentalhealthteam@ottawa.ca.   For more information, please contact Carole Legault at 613-580-6744, extension 23664. 

Veuillez noter que ces ateliers sont aussi offerts en français.  Pour vous inscrire ou pour plus d’information, veuillez communiquer avec Carole Legault au 613-580-6744, poste 23664 ou par courriel à carole.legault@ottawa.ca

How to Talk About Mental Health

Talking about mental health can be hard for some people. Learn about safe ways to talk about your own mental health or illness and how to support others sharing their challenges with you.

 Transcript

Think about a time when you had good news to share with someone...maybe you did well at school or your manager recognized your hard work. Who did you share this with?

We like to share good news with those we care about and trust, but many of us find  it hard to tell someone if we are not doing so well. This can be especially true for those of us living with mental health challenges or illnesses.

In fact, 42% of Canadians were not sure if they would socialize with a friend who has a mental illness!

So you can see the impact that stigma can have on us talking about our mental health. Some even said the stigma can be even worse than the illness itself...

...and this stigma can prevent people from getting help early or even at all, and can limit the supports people need to get better. 

Let's look at an example:

This is Juan

Juan has been worrying a lot lately and is feeling very stressed. He's not sleeping well and is feeling really sad. He doesn't want to tell his family or friends because he thinks they won't understand. So he has been keeping his feelings to himself for months and things are getting worse.

Luckily, Juan's friend Marco has noticed changes in Juan and asks "Hey ....what's going on, you haven't been yourself lately, how ya doing?"

Juan trusts Marco because he's been there for him in the past. He feels Marco is a safe person to talk to, so he shares how badly he's feeling. Marco listens and tells Juan that he is there for him.

After some research, Marco suggests that they call a distress center line to get more information on what to do next, and where more help is available

Unfortunately, not everyone has a friend like Marco...and because of stigma, we don't always treat mental health challenges the same as we do physical health challenges.  

Think about the last time you weren't feeling well physically, like when you had a fever that didn't go away, or you sprained your ankle........

What did you do?

You probably told someone close to you and went to get it checked out right away!

Just like physical health challenges... we need to treat our mental health in the same way!

It's important to talk to a professional if you are having challenges with your mental health. Getting support EARLY can help us stay mentally healthy or prevent our mental health challenges from getting worse.

When going through mental health challenges or illness, it also helps to talk about how you are doing with the people you love and trust so they can support you.

You don't HAVE to share with others, but it can really help to have positive supports in your life when going through difficult times.

It is up to you if and when  you will share.

If you do share REMEMBER, some people may not respond the way you want them to. Some communities and families NEVER talk about mental health.

Some people might even be mean to you. This can be especially true if you talk about your struggles on social media. People can be mean out there! Make sure you are in a good place and ready before you share or post anything online.....and remember, if you need help but don't know where to go, call a distress centre line as there are ALWAYS professionals who can help you.

Once you feel you are in a safe place and want to share, how do you start?

Well, start by picking people you really trust.

Ask them if you can share something with them

Tell them how you are feeling.

You don't have to share everything at once...

if the person responds in a positive way.... you can always share more and talk to them again.

If the person doesn't respond well, think about who else may be a safe person to share with.

And if someone shares their concerns with you, you don't have to know all the answers...or give any answers, in fact it's best to just listen, be supportive and encourage them to get help.

If you are concerned about their safety or your safety, call 911 or your local distress line.

Think about some things you can do that would make you feel more comfortable to start talking about your own mental health, or things you can do if someone shares their mental health challenges with you.

Write these things down so you can go back to them when you need them...... 

For more info and resources on mental health and mental illnesses ...and when and where to get help.... check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Brought to you by Ottawa Public Health with support from Bell Let's Talk

 

Reducing Stigma

The stigma around mental illnesses can keep people from getting the help they need and keep people from supporting each other through difficult times. Everyone can help to reduce stigma in our community. Get some ideas about how we can all help decrease stigma.

Transcript

Have you ever felt left out or judged by people because they thought you were different from them?

Maybe you've been discriminated against?

How did this affect you?

Maybe you felt misunderstood...embarrassed, alone, or even afraid?

That is what stigma might feel like.

So what is stigma?

Stigma is a set of negative beliefs, and prejudices, about a group of people Stigma also includes negative behaviors towards groups of people. Many people face stigma because of their race, religion, sexuality, gender, economic situation and a variety of other things.

People living with mental illnesses often face stigma and discrimination. This can make them feel ashamed, hopeless, distressed, reluctant to get help or accept help and feel like they are to blame for their illness.

In fact, almost half of Canadians thought people use the term mental illness as an excuse for bad behavior, and 27% said they would be fearful of being around someone who has a serious mental illness.

Why do some people think this way?

Well...many years ago, mental illnesses were not well understood. We didn't know how mental illnesses influenced a person's brain or affected their thoughts, feelings and behaviors.

People with mental illnesses were not treated with the support they needed, and were considered outcasts or even dangerous.

To end stigma, people need to understand and accept that mental illnesses are like any other health conditions and need the right treatment. 

We would never say to someone "just think positively and your diabetes will go away"   But how many times have you heard "try to be happy...think positively...don't be so depressed. You have so many good things in your life."

Let's look at an example of how stigma can hurt someone.

Stephan is a first year university student. He likes his program and has some new friends.  

However, Stephan feels stressed and overwhelmed by all of his schoolwork and being away from home. He is not feeling like himself and most days he doesn't want to get out of bed. He's afraid his friends will think he's weak if he tells them ...and he doesn't want anyone seeing him at the clinic so he doesn't reach out for help on campus...

His feelings get worse...and he's having a hard time staying in school.

Like with Stephan, the stigma people experience often prevents them from getting help and support from family, friends and professionals.

We know from research that the sooner someone gets help, the better the outcome will be. This is true for all health conditions, including mental illnesses.

So.....how can we reduce stigma and help people like Stephan? 

  1. Think about your own feelings about mental illnesses. Do you have biases or judge people?
  2. Be aware of language: avoid using words that can be hurtful like "psycho" or "crazy"....
  3. Think about and discuss what you see in the media: How people with mental illnesses are shown in the media is not always accurate or fair...
  4. Learn more about mental illnesses: check out trusted websites like the Canadian Mental Health Association or Bell Let's Talk
  5. Explore opportunities for relationships with people in your life who have mental health challenges and illnesses.

After watching this video, make a list of ways you can help yourself and your communities become more accepting of all people including those of us living with mental illness.

Think about one thing you can do now to help reduce stigma around mental illness?

It could be a small thing like not using hurtful and labeling words...

It could be reaching out to someone who you think might be struggling and encouraging them to get help...

It could be sharing your own experience living with a mental illness with someone you trust...if that feels comfortable and safe for you.

All of these things help reduce stigma and keep it from stopping others...and ourselves...from getting help when needed.

For more info and resources on stigma, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Brought to you by Ottawa Public Health with support from Bell Let's Talk.

Building Resilience

Being resilient is good for our mental health because it helps us recover and work through challenges in a positive way. You can learn resilience skills at any time. Check out ways to build your resilience or help others build their resilience.

Transcript

Think of a challenging time in your life.

Maybe you had a problem at school...or work...or with your partner.

Maybe you were under a lot of financial stress...

Did you find it hard to get through this time?

What helped you move forward?

Being able to work through life's challenges in a positive way is called being resilient.

Resilience is about being able to cope through challenging times...and recover afterwards.

It helps us to thrive and reach our full potential - even when times are tough and it can make the difference between feeling overwhelmed by a challenge and using the experience as something to learn from.

Resilience doesn't come from having a perfect life. It doesn't mean we always have to be happy. In fact, it's normal to feel sad or angry during tough situations.

Resilience is more about how we move forward through the challenges and deal with them successfully!

Sounds like a good thing ...right?

It is! In fact, research shows that being resilient helps us recover from illness faster, live longer, and do better in our daily activities. It also helps us to have happier, healthier relationships. 

The good news is that we can all practice skills to be more resilient and to help others be resilient too.

Being resilient is not just something you are born with .....or without. It's something we can ALL work on over time! We can even help teach our family these skills. Improving our resilience skills helps protect us against mental health challenges and illnesses in the future.

Let's look at an example.

This is Jennifer.

Jennifer has been having a hard time lately and is feeling stressed and upset.

Her mom isn't well, she has some major bills she didn't expect this month and her dog Shilo passed away a couple of weeks ago.

So, what are some things that Jennifer can do to help her through this hard time?

Well, she can think about things that helped her cope in the past.

She knows that  ...

  • being active
  • listening to her favorite music,
  • and spending time with her friends and family helps her feel  better

She can also think about good things in her life ... like her relationship with her partner. She can think of solutions for some of the things she has control over...maybe she can work some extra shifts to help with the bills.

Jennifer should also know that talking to a health care professional is always a good idea when going through difficult times.

One of the best parts about resilience that It is never too early or too late to start practicing!

So, let's recap some proven ways to build and maintain resilience ...

Like...

  • Knowing your strengths
  • Thinking of things that you are grateful for
  • Being able to find solutions to challenging situations
  • Being OK with not doing everything perfectly
  • Practicing deep breathing and meditation or mindfulness.
  • Asking friends, family or a health care professional for help.
  • Letting your kids work through challenges and supporting them as they  learn how to deal with their struggles
  • And of course eating healthy, having healthy hobbies, getting enough sleep and spending time with your loved ones help us all.
  • Like Jennifer, we can all benefit from these tips when we are going through challenges...and we can even pass them onto others when they are going through difficult times.

So now....think about the things that helped you with a challenging period in your life.

What new things could you do next time that would be help?

Write these things down...so you can go back to the list to when you need it.

Try one thing this week that you can do to build on and maintain resilience in your life!

For more info and resources on resilience check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Brought to you by Ottawa Public Health with support from Bell Let's Talk.

Caring for Yourself, the Caregiver

Taking care of someone with a mental illness can be rewarding and challenging. It is important to take care of yourself FIRST so you can take care of others. Find ways to help you be the best caregiver you can be.

Transcript

Think of someone in your life that you care for ...or someone that you might need to care for in the future.

How DOES this, or how COULD this affect your life?

Did you know that there are more than 8 million people in Canada who provide care to a friend or loved one?

And....more than half a million of these people are caring for someone living with mental health challenges or illnesses?

Maybe you're one of these people...or you know someone who is!

Being a caregiver can be very rewarding. It can also be challenging at times... and affect your own physical health and mental health.

The good news is there are things you can do to help you and your loved ones stay healthy.

Let's look at an example. This is Samira.

Samira has a job and also helps care for her sister Aiyana who lives with a mental illness. 

Samira loves her sister, and is happy to help.... but she's finding it hard to balance work and her personal life. She doesn't have much time for herself...and feels conflicted.... she wants to help her sister but she also wants to see her friends more and maybe even travel.

What could Samira do to help her sister, and herself?

Like all caregivers, it's important that Samira knows her limits...WHAT she can do and HOW MUCH she can do...And also knows where to get help, when to ask others for help, and how to accept help when it's offered.

It's important for caregivers to try to take care of themselves FIRST so they are better able to take care of others.

So what else could Samira do?

Samira could plan how many hours a week she needs to get her own work and activities done...how much free time she needs to take care of herself and then decide how much time she can spend helping her sister.

Maybe she can get support from her workplace and ask her manager about flexible working hours.

She could speak to a health care professional about her unique situation.

She could join a support group to learn more about her sister's illness and how other people are managing in similar situations.

She can also ask her family and friends for help...or get help from community-based services.

Everyone's caring experience is different...and so are the feelings that go along with it. You may have both positive and negative feelings. That is completely natural.

Sometimes your emotions might feel out of your control, BUT they are not right or wrong.

Practice feeling your emotions without judging them and think about WHY you feel certain things...This can help you understand how your emotions affect your actions and maybe even how they affect the person you care for.

If you notice unusual changes in your emotions, your physical health, or your mental health, talk to a health care professional as soon as you can. Remember that you are important and need to take care of yourself too.

Even if you're not a caregiver, you probably know someone who is. Being kind and supportive to them and to the people they care for can really help.

After watching this video, make a list of things you can do to take care of yourself as a caregiver or support someone else who is a caregiver...

Pick one of these thinks you can DO this week...to help you or someone you know be the best caregiver possible!

Even small things can make a big difference.

For more info and resources on being a caregiver, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Brought to you by Ottawa Public Health with support from Bell Let's Talk.

Building Social Connections

Connecting with people we care about is an important way to protect and improve our mental health. Find out ways to improve your connections or make new ones.

Transcript

Think of the last time you spent time with family...or friends...or people you care about...

How did this make you feel?

Being connected with people in your life helps you feel like you belong...it even helps reduce stress, boosts your immune system, lowers blood pressure and can lengthen your life.

In fact, people with strong social support are usually happier, have better mental health, and feel a stronger sense of belonging in their community.

Unfortunately.... people who feel alone or isolated often have poor health.

In fact, new research has shown that not having social relationships can shorten our lives as much as smoking over 100 cigarettes per week.

But......the good news is that we can all do things to change this and to help ourselves and others feel more connected.

Let's look at an example.

This is Sammy. He just moved to a new city and does not have any family there. Because his new job takes up a lot of his time, he hasn't made any close friends yet. He comes home from work most days and spends time by himself watching TV or on his computer....he misses having his family around....and is starting to feel a little more sad and tired each day.

So what can Sammy do to get better connected with others?

Sammy can start by:

Getting out and exploring his new neighborhood...maybe he can check out his  community centre to see what activities they have

He can have lunch or go for a walk with his new co-workers... 

Sammy loves cycling but doesn't know the area. He could visit a bike shop to see if there are neighborhood bike groups or look online for a bike group to join.

Volunteering is another great way to get connected in your community. He could check out Volunteer Canada, the local newspaper or local agencies to see where volunteer help is needed.

Like most of us, there may be a time when Sammy needs a little more help. When moving to a new city, recovering from an illness or going through a life change - calling someone you trust or talking to a health professional can really help.

If available, Sammy could get support from his employee assistance program at work or call 2-1-1 to find out about programs and resources for support.

The reality is that we all need people in our life during good times and during tough times. 

Make sure to reach out when you need help, be open to accept help when it is offered and help others in return.

So now, try to think about something you can do to make your connections stronger.

Are there people in your life or groups that you could reach out to?

How about others in your community who would benefit from more connections?

Could you offer to make a meal for a new parent or caregiver, or maybe a neighbor who is having a tough time?

Write all of your ideas down and pick one thing you can do this week to get more connected or to help others get more connected.

Even small things...like holding the door for someone; taking out the garbage for your neighbor....bringing food to someone in need...

These all can lead to big changes that can improve your connections, your physical health and your mental health.

For more info and resources on building social connectedness check out haveTHATtalk.ca.

Brought to you by Ottawa Public Health with support from Bell Let's Talk.

Promotional Trailer

Transcript

We talk about lots of things during our day.....the weather...sports...things we like to talk about and things that are hard to talk about...

But what about THAT talk? You know... the one about mental health.

It could be one of the most important talks you'll ever have!

One in 5 Canadians will experience a mental illness at some point in their life.

It could be you, or someone you care about.

So let's take action to reduce stigma, increase support, and encourage people to get help sooner.

Check out haveTHATtalk.ca to learn more.

Brought to you by Ottawa Public Health with support from Bell Let's Talk.

Activity guide

Watch one or all five have THAT talk videos and then work on the suggested activities in this Activity Guide. You can do these yourself or organize a group: 

Resources

If you or someone you know is in a crisis, call your local distress centre. For emergencies, call 911 or visit your local emergency department. 

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