For workplaces

For Workplaces

These whiteboard animation videos on the 13 factors in the National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace will be a helpful resource for all workplaces in Ottawa. Let's keep the conversation going about mental health. Each of the videos has a facilitator's guide to help get the conversation started.  

Introduction

 

Transcript 

Did you know that 70% of working Canadians are concerned about psychological health and safety in the workplace?

Psychological health and safety means preventing harm to mental health, and promoting psychological well-being.

Mental health and safety is just as important as physical health and safety... let's face it... there is no health without mental health.

Learn how YOU and YOUR workplace can work to improve the 13 factors for psychological health and safety in the workplace.

Visit have haveTHATtalk.ca to watch the videos and to learn more.

Organizational culture

 

Transcript

"Culture." When you hear this word... what comes to mind?

Is it the differences in people's beliefs?

Is it what people value?

Or maybe... it's the shared expectations people have to act a certain way?

Now think of your workplace. How is this different from OTHER places where you've worked or studied? How were expectations different? Did your employer value different things?

The fact is ... ALL workplaces are different. They ALL have their own organizational culture.  This means they ALL have different norms, meanings, values and beliefs. Different employers have different expectations of their workers. All of these factors help form "an organizational culture." Workers use this culture to decide HOW TO act and HOW TO solve problems.

What does a POSITIVE organizational culture look like?

Well, let me first tell you a story.

This is LeAnne.

LeAnne feels constantly stressed at work. She feels that her work environment lacks respect, trust, and honesty.

LeAnne works very hard but feels that in order to succeed at her job, she has to fit in with the culture, or it may be considered a sign of weakness. She's always in competition with her coworkers. Everyday LeAnne comes to work wanting to look for another job... somewhere ANYWHERE but here.

This was an example of what a negative organizational culture could look like.

On the other side of things, workplace cultures that ARE psychologically safe and healthy have trust, honesty, and respect... people treat each other with civility and respect. Decisions are made in a fair way.  People feel like they're part of a team, working toward the same goal.

Some signs that you have a positive culture would be:

  • that people are satisfied with the work they do;

  • there's great morale and teamwork;

  • and you feel supported.

A workplace with a positive organizational culture is somewhere where people WANT TO work and WANT TO stay. People in the community feel it's a good place to work, even if they don't work there.

So, what are some things that you can do in your workplace to help build a positive organizational culture?

Employees can try a teambuilding activity.

Managers can look at starting a mentorship program between emerging and more experienced leaders.

Everyone can help set the tone for positive organizational culture by:

  • Writing down what your company BELIEVES... what they VALUE...and what is the PURPOSE of the work you are doing.

  • Starting a walking group or activity during lunch. Getting outside. Connecting with nature. 

  • Taking your breaks. Have some time to connect with your coworkers or someone in your life.

Take some time NOW to write down what YOU are ALREADY doing to contribute to a positive organizational culture and what YOU CAN BE DOING. Even if it's just ONE thing, YOU can make a difference.

Organizational culture is one of 13 factors that support psychological health and safety in the workplace. Learn more at: MentalHealthCommission.ca/NationalStandard

For more resources for your workplace, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Developed in collaboration by Ottawa Public Health and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

With content adapted with permission from Mindful Employer Canada

And support from Bell Let's Talk.

Organizational Culture Worksheet

Download Organizational Culture Worksheet

Facilitator Notes: 

Use this worksheet to encourage a discussion about Organizational Culture. It is one of thirteen factors that have been shown to impact mental health of individuals in the workplace. Be sure to encourage discussion by being open to all answers and opinions from participants. Examples of possible discussion groups are: employees at a team meeting or lunch and learn, staff or management orientation, and union-member discussions.

Suggested materials:

laptop, speakers, projector and screen, flip charts and markers, whiteboard or chalkboard.

Suggested Process:

Watch the video once at www.haveTHATtalk.ca
Read definition of Organizational Culture:
On the Agenda defines Organizational Culture as the degree to which a work culture is characterized by trust, honesty, and fairness.

Ask participants:

 1. Think of a time at work when you did not feel that your beliefs or values were respected. How did that make you feel?

 2. What does a positive work environment look like to you?

Watch the video again.

Ask participants:

3. What could have been done differently in the scenario with LeAnne?

4. What are some strategies to help YOUR workplace to promote a healthy Organizational Culture?

5. Write down different ways that YOU can contribute to a positive Organizational Culture.

 

Psychological and social support

Transcript 

Think of your workplace. Have you ever noticed a change in the way someone behaved? Perhaps they started coming in later... or maybe they were missing meetings or deadlines when normally they're on time with these types of things.

What did YOU do in that situation? Did you speak to them about what you saw? Maybe that person was YOU and maybe you were worried what others would think of you. Did YOU feel supported?

Let's look at an example. This is Eileen. Eileen has been a bit more quiet and keeping to herself lately. This is not typical of her.  She has also been coming in late to work. Her supervisor, Marco, is becoming concerned about the changes he sees. Marco takes Eileen aside and says, "You don't seem to be yourself lately. How is everything going?". Eileen explains that her partner has recently been injured and can't work. She's been feeling anxious about her family and it's making her feel distracted at work. Since her partner is injured, she also has had double the responsibilities at home. Eileen now has to get her son to childcare before and after school, which is why she has been showing up late.

Her supervisor had no idea this was going on with Eileen. As a supervisor, he can thank her for explaining her situation, which will help him to support her better while still ensuring that she is able to keep her work on track.

When we talk about "psychological and social support" we are talking about the level of trust and connections that exist in a workplace. It also refers to the level of help and assistance provided by others while performing tasks.

As a supervisor there are many things you can do to support your staff. You can suggest workplace Employee Assistance Programs... or EAP... that can help during times of need. There are also other counseling services in the community that you can recommend.  Other options include creating a "stay at work" plan that can accommodate your employee's needs.

As an employee, be sure to let your supervisor know that you are going through a difficult time. Even if you don't want to share details, letting them know that you require support or flexibility to get through a difficult time can helpful. They might be able to give you the flexibility you need to get through a hard time.

So, what is ONE way that YOU can promote psychological and social support in your workplace TODAY?

Psychological and social support is one of 13 factors of psychological health and safety in the workplace.

Learn more at: MentalHealthCommission.ca/NationalStandard

For more resources for your workplace, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Developed in collaboration by Ottawa Public Health and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

With content adapted with permission from Mindful Employer Canada

And support from Bell Let's Talk. 

Psychological and Social Support Worksheet

Download Psychological and Social Support Worksheet

Facilitator Notes:

Use this worksheet to encourage a discussion about Psychological and Social Support. It is one of thirteen factors that have been shown to impact mental health of individuals in the workplace. Be sure to encourage discussion by being open to all answers and opinions from participants. Examples of possible discussion groups are: employees at a team meeting or lunch and learn, staff or management orientation, and union-member discussions.

Suggested materials:

laptop, speakers, projector and screen, flip charts and markers, whiteboard or chalkboard.

Suggested Process:

Watch the video once at www.haveTHATtalk.ca

Read definition of Psychological and Social Support:

On the Agenda defines Psychological and Social Support as present in a work environment in which coworkers and supervisors are supportive of employees' psychological and mental health concerns and respond appropriately as needed.

Ask participants:

 1. Think of a time at work when you did not feel psychologically supported. How did that make you feel?

 2. What does a Psychologically and Socially Supportive work environment look like to you?

Watch the video again.

Ask participants:

  3. What could have been done differently in the scenario with Eileen and Marco?

  4. What are some strategies to help YOUR workplace to be more Psychologically and Socially Supportive?

  5. Write down different ways that YOU can promote Psychological and Social Support in your workplace. 

Clear leadership and expectations

 Transcript

Think of a time at work when you were given direction that was UNCLEAR.

Did it happen often? Did it create conflict?

Clear leadership and expectations can make a BIG difference in a workplace. Take Tim for example. Tim wrote a report for his supervisor last week that he thought was URGENT. His supervisor returned his report with a note saying "Needs more work." There was NO other feedback... NO meeting to clarify... NO phone message....NO edits on the document... NOTHING but the note. This is an ongoing problem in Tim's workplace. Tim feels frustrated and doesn't really trust his supervisor anymore.

What would clear leadership and expectations look like in a HEALTHY workplace? 

Well... everyone in a healthy workplace knows WHAT they need to do. They know HOW the things they do contribute to the workplace as a whole. They are told in a TIMELY way if there are any changes happening in with the workplace.

When workplaces have clear leadership and expectations:

  • Morale is positive even during times of change or high stress.
  • There's usually more trust between leaders and workers.
  • And Leaders value EVERYONE'S psychological and physical health... and they model positive healthy behaviors to their workers.

CLEAR two-way communication is very important in a workplace.  Sometimes it takes time to get to know your supervisor and their expectations. Everyone in a workplace has a responsibility to ask questions if they don't understand-whether you are an employee, supervisor or manager. 

As a supervisor, make it very clear WHAT you want, WHEN you want it by, and WHO you want involved.

As an employee, don't be afraid to ask questions to clarify. Being open to talking about the SIZE of a task, HOW LONG it should take, WHEN to ask for support...even just flat out asking "what do you expect of me"- are all helpful.

After watching this video, how do YOU intend to be CLEAR with YOUR expectations TODAY?

Clear leadership and expectations is one of 13 factors that support psychological health and safety in the workplace. Learn more at: MentalHealthCommission.ca/NationalStandard

For more resources for your workplace, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Developed in collaboration by Ottawa Public Health and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

With content adapted with permission from Mindful Employer Canada

And support from Bell Let's Talk.

Clear Leadership and Expectations Worksheet

 Download Clear Leadership and Expectations Worksheet

Facilitator Notes:

Use this worksheet to encourage a discussion about Clear Leadership and Expectations. It is one of thirteen factors that have been shown to impact mental health of individuals in the workplace. Be sure to encourage discussion by being open to all answers and opinions from participants. Examples of possible discussion groups are: employees at a team meeting or lunch and learn, staff or management orientation, and union-member discussions.

Suggested materials:

laptop, speakers, projector and screen, flip charts and markers, whiteboard or chalkboard.

Suggested Process:

Watch the video once at www.haveTHATtalk.ca

Read definition of Clear Leadership and Expectations:

On the Agenda defines Clear Leadership and Expectations as present in an environment in which leadership is effective and there is support that helps employees know what they need to do, how their work contributes to the organization and whether there are impending changes.

Ask participants:

 1. Think of a time at work when you were given unclear direction. What did you do to get more information?

 2. What does Clear Leadership and Expectations mean to you?

Watch the video again.

Ask participants:

 3. What could have been done differently in the scenario with Tim and his supervisor?

 4. What are some strategies to help YOUR workplace promote Clear Leadership and Expectations?

 5. Write down different ways that YOU can be clearer with your expectations.

Civility and respect

Transcript

Think of a time at work where you felt frustrated. How would it look like to others when you are frustrated or angry? Do you think your actions would be seen to be uncivil or disrespectful?

Even though we all have stress and moments when we aren't our best selves, it's important we make sure that we treat one another with civility and respect. This includes how we treat each other on a day-to-day basis, but also how we treat each other when CONFLICT arises. Do people try to calm the situation and explore solutions, or do they make things worse?

Civility and respect means showing appreciation, care, and consideration for EVERYONE, whether they're coworkers, management, or clients.

When someone is not civil, it can be distracting, annoying or irritating behaviours... things like eye rolling when someone is talking or using lots of negative sarcasm. In some situations, being uncivil can escalate to more threatening behaviours such as racial slurs, intimidation, or physical violence.

Let's look at an example.

This is Trung. Trung is new to Canada, and is learning to speak English. Trung has vast experience working with teams and projects. He has a lot of wisdom and perspective that he could bring to his team.

Now this is Sylvia. It's Sylvia's job to gather everyone's feedback about the project. Before wrapping up the team meeting, Sylvia asks each employee if there is anything they'd like to add. When she comes to Trung, she lets him know that he can just watch until he knows more about the project. Sylvia doesn't want Trung to feel pressured to add anything until he's settled and feeling comfortable in his new role.

Sylvia may not be aware... but to Trung and his co-workers, this MAY have been seen as a LACK OF RESPECT for Trung's abilities.

Trung has LOTS of experience.  Even though he is learning to speak English, it's important to ask for his input. He may VERY WELL feel comfortable sharing.

If situations like this happen again and again, it could cause FRUSTRATION and lead to CONFLICT within the team.

In a psychologically safe and healthy workplace, people will work well in teams, and morale will be positive. This is because everyone has an underlying respect for each other. There will be less conflict and more effective solutions when conflict DOES happen.

As a supervisor or as an employee, we all need to be careful not to assume what people WANT or NEED. People see the world through different eyes.

We often say "Treat people the way YOU want to be treated"... but it's really about "Treating people the way THEY want to be treated."  

Respect the differences in people. This could be someone's culture, religion, language, or even just their working style. Sometimes people are more direct. Sometimes people value the process more than the outcome. For some, building a strong team or having a vision of the future means more than just doing the work. 

Workplaces can also look into training and policies that help promote respect... such as:

A zero-tolerance policy for bullying,

Diversity training or

Conflict resolution training 

What are some ways that YOU will help promote civility and respect? Write down one thing you intend to do in the next week.

Showing civility and respect is one of 13 factors that support psychological health and safety in the workplace. Learn more at: MentalHealthCommission.ca/NationalStandard

For more resources for your workplace, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Developed in collaboration by Ottawa Public Health and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

With content adapted with permission from Mindful Employer Canada

And support from Bell Let's Talk. 

Civility and Respect Worksheet

Download Civility and Respect Worksheet

Facilitator Notes:

Use this worksheet to encourage a discussion about Civility and Respect. It is one of thirteen factors that have been shown to impact mental health of individuals in the workplace. Be sure to encourage discussion by being open to all answers and opinions from participants. Examples of possible discussion groups are: employees at a team meeting or lunch and learn, staff or management orientation, and union-member discussions.

Suggested materials:

laptop, speakers, projector and screen, flip charts and markers, whiteboard or chalkboard.

Suggested Process:

Watch the video once at www.haveTHATtalk.ca

Read definition of Civility and Respect:

On the Agenda defines Civility and Respect as present in a work environment where employees are respectful and considerate in their interactions with one another, as well as with customers, clients, and the public.

Ask participants:

 1. Think of a time when you did not feel respected. How did you react?

 2. What are some signs of disrespect? Are these the same for everyone?

Watch the video again.

Ask participants:

 3. What could have been done differently in the scenario with Trung, Sylvia and their coworkers?

 4. What are some strategies to help YOUR workplace promote Civility and Respect?

 5. Write down different ways that YOU can help promote Civility and Respect

Psychological demands

Transcript
Think about your job. What type of a setting do you work in? Do you interact with a lot people? Do you have to travel a lot, or work in shifts?

Now try thinking about another job. Maybe it's paramedic services. If you were a paramedic would you struggle seeing people in distress? Maybe it's a job in sales. Would you find it hard to deal with the pressure of meeting sales targets? Or maybe it's a job in construction. Would the thought of working outdoors, around a lot of noise or dust, be stressful?

Every person has different things that cause them stress. Depending on your own fears, preferences and personality, you may be suited for certain types of jobs more than others. Every job has its own set of psychological demands. Psychological demands are aspects of our jobs that could be a hazard to our health and well being if not properly matched to our skills, knowledge, personality and emotional intelligence. When you are aware of the psychological demands of your job, it will give you the chance to prepare and respond to those demands.

Let's look at an example. This is Pierre. Pierre works in a small business where he is expected to perform multiple tasks. In his current role, Pierre already has a lot of responsibilities with client accounts. Because Pierre has such a good relationship with his current clients, Pierre's manager has asked him to also take on a new task of handling COMPLAINTS. Pierre handled customer complaints in his previous job... The lack of support from his previous manager lead to increased anxiety at work... which was one of the reasons why he left. Pierre is anxious that he will find himself in the same situation...AGAIN. He's afraid that he might start to dislike his new job.

So what could Pierre's workplace do to support him?

Pierre's manager could book a meeting with him to look at the psychological demands of his new role. This could include Pierre's manager telling him the things that others have found demanding about the job. This will give Pierre and his manager an opportunity to review the new job expectations...They could discuss what Pierre needs to feel supported in his new role... perhaps he might need some job training. They can also compare the workload between his current and future roles. Pierre and his manager can talk about how his workload expectations will change, but still feel balanced, by taking on client complaints. 

 It's important to Pierre's manager that Pierre feels supported in his new role so that it doesn't affect the great relationships Pierre has already built with his clients.

As an employee, Pierre can also ask his manager for the support that he needs.  Sometimes, the manager is not aware what someone finds demanding.

We all have different personalities and different experiences that shape how we see the word.

If you need any accommodation to do your job safely, be sure to let your manager know.

Try making a list of the psychological demands of your job. Are there areas that can be made less stressful? How can you make this happen for yourself? 

Psychological demands is one of 13 factors that support psychological health and safety in the workplace. Learn more at: MentalHealthCommission.ca/NationalStandard

For more resources for your workplace, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Developed in collaboration by Ottawa Public Health and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

With content adapted with permission from Mindful Employer Canada

And support from Bell Let's Talk.

Psychological Demands Worksheet

Download Psychological Demands Worksheet

Facilitator Notes:

Use this worksheet to encourage a discussion about Psychological Demands. It is one of thirteen factors that have been shown to impact mental health of individuals in the workplace. Be sure to encourage discussion by being open to all answers and opinions from participants. Examples of possible discussion groups are: employees at a team meeting or lunch and learn, staff or management orientation, and union-member discussions.

Suggested materials:

laptop, speakers, projector and screen, flip charts and markers, whiteboard or chalkboard.

Suggested Process:

Watch the video once at www.haveTHATtalk.ca

Read definition of Psychological Demands:

On the Agenda defines Psychological Demands as present in a work environment where there is a good fit between employees' interpersonal and emotional competencies and the requirements of the position they hold.

Ask participants: 

 1. Think of a time at work when you felt that your job demands did not match your emotional and interpersonal competencies. What did you do to maintain your mental health, while ensuring you accomplished necessary tasks?

 2. What do the psychological demands of your job mean to you? Is this different for you than it is for your colleague(s)?

Watch the video again.

Ask participants:

 3. What could have been done differently in the scenario with Pierre and his manager?

 4. What are some strategies to help YOUR workplace respond to Psychological Demands?

 5. Write down different ways that YOU can help manage Psychological Demands in your workplace.

Growth and development

Transcript

Have you ever had a mentor? Someone you looked up to at work. What types of things did they teach you? Did that relationship make you happier at work?  Did that relationship help you to do your job better?

Now think of the best training you've ever taken. Maybe it was at school, a workshop, or even just a presentation. What was special about it? Did you learn something new that you could apply to your job or maybe to ANOTHER part of your life?

All people have needs. We have basic needs like eating and sleeping, the need to feel safe, and to feel included, like we belong in some type of community... but we also have the need to grow... to feel like we have accomplished something... as well as the desire to learn new things and gain new skills to reach our full potential in life.

This is Tarek. Tarek works in the service department of a local car body shop. He enjoys working with his hands but he also enjoys being around people. He aspires to be the service manager one day. Right now, Tarek doesn't really feel challenged by his job. He's been assigned to checking tire pressure and oil levels. He feels this is a bit repetitive. How could Tarek grow and develop in his career?

When a workplace values growth and development, workers are supported with their goals... these could be to be better with PEOPLE skills, EMOTIONAL skills, or JOB skills. 

Employers play an important role in the growth and development of their staff. In Tarek's example, there are opportunities that his workplace could provide, such as providing time or funds for training. His supervisor could also help Tarek to create a development plan.  

What are some things that Tarek could do to be proactive with his development?

If Tarek's workplace valued his growth and development, the first step he could take is to TALK with his supervisor about his goals. He could meet with his supervisor to learn how he became a service manager. Maybe Tarek could be given time to watch and learn from one of his coworkers who does more complex tasks. Tarek could take a course, or a workshop to learn more skills.

There are many things that employees can also do to promote their own growth and development.

Think of YOUR job. What are some of the skills YOU want to learn? How can you make this happen?

It doesn't always have to be something that costs money. There are a lot of free webinars and resources available.

Maybe you could be a guest at one of your supervisor's meetings to get a feel for what they do. You can learn what type of issues they face, and the job expectations that come with their role.

You could ask a leader to be your mentor, or job shadow someone in a position that interests you.

Perhaps you could ask to get more constructive feedback from your supervisor. Ask questions like "What are some ways I can improve in my role?" or "How do you think I can grow to take on more responsibilities?"

It could be that YOU'RE at the point in your career where YOU might grow by mentoring someone else.

Sometimes meeting with other workers just to talk about how you dealt with challenging times at work can help all of you grow together.

Depending on what else you have going on in your life; you may want to grow in ways OUTSIDE of work. Maybe it's being on a sports team, or volunteering in the community, or taking a class in something you've always wanted to try.

What is one way that YOU would like to grow?

How will this help you to develop in your career?

What can you do TODAY to get started? 

Growth and Development is one of 13 factors that support psychological health and safety in the workplace. Learn more at: MentalHealthCommission.ca/NationalStandard

For more resources for your workplace, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Developed in collaboration by Ottawa Public Health and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

With content adapted with permission from Mindful Employer Canada

And support from Bell Let's Talk.

Growth and Development Worksheet

Download Growth and Development Worksheet

Facilitator Notes:

Use this worksheet to encourage a discussion about Growth and Development. It is one of thirteen factors that have been shown to impact mental health of individuals in the workplace. Be sure to encourage discussion by being open to all answers and opinions from participants. Examples of possible discussion groups are: employees at a team meeting or lunch and learn, staff or management orientation, and union-member discussions.

Suggested materials:

laptop, speakers, projector and screen, flip charts and markers, whiteboard or chalkboard.

Suggested Process:

Watch the video once at www.haveTHATtalk.ca

Read definition of Growth and Development:

On the Agenda defines Growth and Development as present in a work environment where employees receive encouragement and support in the development of their interpersonal, emotional, and job skills.

Ask participants:

 1. Think of some skills that you would like to grow or develop. How would those skills help you either in your current role or to grow into a new role?

 2. What are some ways in which people can contribute to their own growth and development?

Watch the video again.

Ask participants:

 3. What could have been done differently in the scenario with Tarek?

 4. What are some strategies to help YOUR workplace foster Growth and Development?

 5. Write down different ways that YOU can encourage Growth and Development in your workplace.

Recognition and reward

Transcript

Think of a time when you felt appreciated at work. Was it because someone went OUT OF THEIR WAY to give you examples of how WHAT YOU did MATTERED? Did you receive a bonus or special recognition? Maybe you felt valued because you saw how your job helped other people.

This is Rosa. Rosa is a care provider for a small healthcare agency. Rosa LOVES her job because she gets to HELP PEOPLE. Sometimes she works with people who have complex needs. She often gets positive feedback from her clients. Her supervisor knows how hard Rosa works and how tough her job can be... In fact, Rosa's supervisor has received emails, calls and letters telling her how much Rosa's clients value her help.

Rosa's supervisor would like to show Rosa their appreciation for her hard work and dedication to her clients.

She asks Rosa to meet her in her office and explains to her how valued she is by the company as well as her clients. She's taken some of the kind words that her clients have used to describe Rosa and had them framed for her. She gives this to Rosa, letting her know she can display it at work, or take it home. Rosa is grateful for the recognition and thanks her boss for acknowledging that she makes a difference.

It's important to remember that people like to be recognized in different ways. Recognition and reward is present in a workplace where there is APPROPRIATE acknowledgement and appreciation.  People are recognized in a FAIR and TIMELY way.

As a supervisor, it's good to ask how THE PERSON would like to be recognized. Perhaps they are shy and don't like to be recognized publicly. Maybe they don't value money as a reward, or feel an award would be too much. Having criteria or explaining WHAT an employee did to win an award could help coworkers to understand how they too can be recognized. It doesn't mean that EVERYONE needs to be praised for EVERY action they take.

Most of us want to feel like WHAT WE DO MATTERS and is VALUED. Whether you are a supervisor or an employee, it's important to be sincere and consistent with feedback.  If you see someone, whether it's a colleague, supervisor, or your own staff do something great; take the time to tell them. It can go a long way. There are many ways to recognize others, including:

  • Having a team get-together for special milestones...either for work or a personal accomplishment 
  • Recognizing the PROCESS as well as the RESULT. Sometimes people put a lot of work into a project that may not be a huge success... it's important to recognize the hard work and time people invested.
  • Start a peer recognition board where anyone, not just a supervisor, can share how someone did something extra
  • Show kindness for a co-worker to make them feel special 

Think of ONE way YOU can recognize one of your coworkers this week. How will you make this happen?

Recognition and Reward is one of 13 factors that support psychological health and safety in the workplace. Learn more at: MentalHealthCommission.ca/NationalStandard

For more resources for your workplace, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Developed in collaboration by Ottawa Public Health and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

With content adapted with permission from Mindful Employer Canada

And support from Bell Let's Talk.

Recognition and Reward Worksheet

Download Recognition and Reward Worksheet

Facilitator Notes:

Use this worksheet to encourage a discussion about Recognition and Reward. It is one of thirteen factors that have been shown to impact mental health of individuals in the workplace. Be sure to encourage discussion by being open to all answers and opinions from participants. Examples of possible discussion groups are: employees at a team meeting or lunch and learn, staff or management orientation, and union-member discussions.

Suggested materials:

laptop, speakers, projector and screen, flip charts and markers, whiteboard or chalkboard.

Suggested Process:

Watch the video once at www.haveTHATtalk.ca

Read definition of Recognition and Reward:

On the Agenda defines Recognition and Reward as present in a work environment where there is appropriate acknowledgement and appreciation of employees' efforts in a fair and timely manner.

Ask participants:

 1. Think of a time when you were recognized or appreciated. How did this make you feel?

 2. What are some different ways that people can be rewarded or recognized in a workplace?

Watch the video again.

Ask participants:

 3. What could have been done differently in the scenario with Rosa and her supervisor?

 4. What are some strategies to help YOUR workplace with Recognition and Reward?

 5. What are some different ways that YOU can recognize and reward your colleagues, supervisors, or staff? 

Involvement and influence

Transcript

Think of a time where a DECISION was made in YOUR workplace that affected YOUR work.

Were you involved in that decision?

Did you feel like your feedback was taken into consideration?

KEY DECISIONS need to be made in all workplaces .... Decisions about a SPECIFIC JOB, about a TEAM, or maybe about a workplace as a WHOLE. 

When people have INFLUENCE in the decision making process and they have the chance to be INVOLVED in a meaningful way, they are usually more committed to their work. 

When workers are ASKED to provide feedback instead of merely INFORMED about the changes that affect HOW their work is done, they can often come up with solutions that are more creative and agreeable. This process also allows employees to stand behind the decisions that are being made.

Managers are USUALLY responsible for WHAT is being done; but workers can give input about HOW that work is being done.

There are some things to keep in mind when asking colleagues for their input...

Take Chang for example.

Chang works in a grocery store as the supervisor of the produce department. The store manager, René, had been thinking about changing the layout of the store to improve consumer experience. He has been given a set budget to accomplish this task.

To help him make the best possible decision, René sent out a survey to ask staff for their input about what changes they would like to see.

Chang had MANY suggestions. So did his colleagues.  When the final decisions were made, it seemed like not a lot of the staff feedback was really used.

What did Chang's manager do right?

It is a POSITIVE thing that Chang's manager was trying to involve staff in this change ... It was a good idea to be inclusive and to involve employees in decisions that influence HOW they work. 

What could have been done differently in this situation?

His manager chose NOT to let staff know that the changes had to be made within a SET BUDGET.

While the staff's input would be considered, ULTIMATELY, the manager would have to ensure that all the changes fit inside the budget while also increasing the positive experience of both shoppers and employees.

The manager should have let them know that even though their suggestions were good and valued, they decided to go a different way. This is being transparent.

Even if every decision can't be entirely collaborative, it is important to involve staff by letting them know why decisions have been made.

Chang's manager should be sure to keep workers in the loop when decisions are made.  That way the workers will know that they have been listened to. 

Although all of the staff's suggestions couldn't be incorporated in WHAT the decision point was, management could ask the staff's suggestion on HOW TO ROLL OUT the plan, so that they continue to feel involved in the updates.

Although Chang's manager used a survey, this is not the only way to involve staff. Supervisors could suggest having regular touchdown meetings or a suggestion box for ongoing feedback... or suggest that Managers can have an open-door policy, to hear directly from staff. When employees see the positive outcomes of being involved and being able to influence decisions, they are likely to be more engaged.

Creating a culture of openness makes it feel safe to give feedback as it comes up... not just when requested by managers.

In our example, we focused on a big change. Involvement and influence can also happen with day to day tasks that aren't quite as big.

Think about an important decision you have to make in your workplace. What is ONE way that you can involve others in a MEANINGFUL way?

Involvement and Influence is one of 13 factors that support psychological health and safety in the workplace. Learn more at: MentalHealthCommission.ca/NationalStandard

For more resources for your workplace, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Developed in collaboration by Ottawa Public Health and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

With content adapted with permission from Mindful Employer Canada

And support from Bell Let's Talk.

Involvement and Influence Worksheet

Download Involvement and Influence Worksheet

Facilitator Notes:

Use this worksheet to encourage a discussion about Involvement and Influence. It is one of thirteen factors that have been shown to impact mental health of individuals in the workplace. Be sure to encourage discussion by being open to all answers and opinions from participants. Examples of possible discussion groups are: employees at a team meeting or lunch and learn, staff or management orientation, and union-member discussions.

Suggested materials:

laptop, speakers, projector and screen, flip charts and markers, whiteboard or chalkboard.

Suggested Process:

Watch the video once at www.haveTHATtalk.ca

Read definition of Involvement and Influence:

On the Agenda defines Involvement and Influence as present in a work environment where employees are included in discussions about how their work is done and how important decisions are made.

Ask participants:

 1. Think of a time when you were directly involved in a decision making process. What about a situation where you were not involved? How were these two situations different from each other?

 2. What are some other ways that employees can be involved in decision making in a workplace?

Watch the video again.

Ask participants:

 3. What could have been done differently in the scenario with Chang and René?

 4. What are some strategies to help YOUR workplace with worker Involvement and Influence?

 5. Write down different ways that YOU can become involved in the decision making process and influence the outcome.

Workload management

Transcript

Think of a time when you had a heavy workload. Did you find it STRESSFUL? Perhaps you found it MOTIVATING. How did you manage your TIME? What about your ENERGY?

Workload can vary depending on what's going on in your workplace.

Sometimes there are deadlines or quotas that add temporary work.

Shift work or rush periods can affect how much work may pile up during certain times...

At the heart of WORKLOAD MANAGEMENT is being able to accomplish your assigned tasks and responsibilities successfully within the time available.

Let's meet Jennifer. Jennifer is the manager of a catering company and is used to juggling many clients at work.  For the last few weeks she is finding it hard to balance the needs of her regular clients with a new client that could lead to future opportunities.

She noticed she has been making errors a bit more frequently, and has been working late to keep up with orders.

This is adding to her stress to juggle the demands of keeping all her clients happy. She is wondering what takes priority and how she can make the best decision without compromising a healthy work-life balance. Is her supervisor placing the same priority on certain orders and clients as she is?  

Effective workload management can help employees feel more in control of their responsibilities, as well as reduce stress, burnout and job-related errors, incidents or injuries.

Jennifer has a role to play when it comes to managing her own workload.  She can talk to her supervisor about her concerns.

It is important for Jennifer to have a plan in mind.  She should be thinking about, "what are some solutions to this problem?"  She can ask her supervisor "What is the biggest priority with my clients?" or she can negotiate which orders can wait until after the big orders are done.

Jennifer could ask that some of her tasks or orders can be assigned to other members on the team. Jennifer and her supervisor can also look to see if there are tasks that are just not needed with her job, and that she can let go and not do.

It is important that management be open to hearing suggestions from staff about their workload.  While sometimes it may not be possible to accommodate all of their suggestions, open communication is necessary.

What are three things you can do today to manage your workload more effectively this week?

Do you need to have a conversation with your supervisor? Plan for this conversation ahead of time so you have all the information you need to have an informed discussion.

Workload Management is one of 13 factors that support psychological health and safety in the workplace. Learn more at MentalHealthCommission.ca/NationalStandard

For more resources for your workplace, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Developed in collaboration by Ottawa Public Health and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

With content adapted with permission from Mindful Employer Canada

And support from Bell Let's Talk.

Workload Management Worksheet

Download Workload Management Worksheet

Facilitator Notes:

Use this worksheet to encourage a discussion about Workload Management. It is one of thirteen factors that have been shown to impact mental health of individuals in the workplace. Be sure to encourage discussion by being open to all answers and opinions from participants. Examples of possible discussion groups are: employees at a team meeting or lunch and learn, staff or management orientation, and union-member discussions.

Suggested materials:

laptop, speakers, projector and screen, flip charts and markers, whiteboard or chalkboard.

Suggested Process:

Watch the video once at www.haveTHATtalk.ca

Read definition of Workload Management:

On the Agenda defines Workload Management as present in a work environment where tasks and responsibilities can be accomplished successfully within the time available.

Ask participants:

 1. Think of a time when you had a heavy workload to manage. Did it you find it stressful or motivating?  How did you manage this?

 2. What are some of the effects that an unbalanced workload can have on someone’s work?

Watch the video again.

Ask participants:

 3. What could have been done differently in the scenario with Jennifer?

 4. What are some strategies to help YOUR workplace with Workload Management?

 5. Write down different ways that YOU can manage your workload. 

Engagement 

Transcript

On average, Canadian workers spend about 60% of their waking hours at work. Wouldn't it be nice if your workplace not only made you feel connected but also motivated you to do your best at your job?  Do YOU feel motivated when you are at work? Does YOUR work give you a sense of personal accomplishment? What makes YOU feel inspired at work?

Answering these questions can help you look at how engaged you are in your workplace. Feeling engaged at work is about how CONNECTED you feel to your job. Maybe you can RELATE to the overall MISSION of your company. Perhaps you have a STRONG COMMITMENT to seeing your organization succeed. Maybe you find the work you do really makes a DIFFERENCE. Or maybe work is just work, but your workplace makes you feel part of a community.

Let's look at an example. This is Michael. Michael has worked as a middle-school biology teacher for 10 years. If you knew Michael, you would know that he LOVES biology. It is definitely his passion.  The class that Michael teaches has many kids living with learning disabilities.  He feels like he really makes an impact on his students.  Recently, Michael had been asked to teach a semester of math to an advanced class, instead of his biology class. Michael is open to new opportunities... however, after trying it out for two months, he feels less motivated and less connected to his job. The school principal has noticed that Michael isn't quite as engaged.

In Michael's story, it is quite clear that he feels that the topic of biology is very important for his job satisfaction.  He also feels like he makes a bigger difference with the students who require more support in the classroom. The reasons why someone feels engaged in their job can differ from person to person. In Michael's example, a different teacher may be more engaged depending on the age group they are teaching, where the school is located, or how much support they get from colleagues.

Engagement can be seen in three ways. Being physically engaged means that you are applying yourself at your job. If you are PHYSICALLY engaged in your job, you may see work as a source of energy. If you are EMOTIONALLY engaged at work, you may find that work brings out your passionate side. You probably have a positive outlook at work as well. If you are COGNITIVELY engaged in your work, you may find that you become absorbed in the type of work you are doing. You may be willing to devote more time or energy than is required, just because you find it interesting.

Knowing yourself, including knowing what is important to you when you are at work... what you value... what interests you...what  your talents are... are all important aspects of what makes you, YOU!  The more you know, the more you can share with your supervisor and have an open conversation to ensure your job gives you the opportunity to remain engaged. Research shows that engaged employees have high morale at work and develop good relationships with other colleagues, clients, and customers. This ultimately leads to more retention of skilled employees at work.

Speaking with your supervisor can help to ensure your work matches with what matters to you. If Michael's principal recognizes the sign of change in Michael, she could initiate a conversation with him.  It is important for the principal or any supervisor to notice when staff are becoming disengaged.  This way, action can be taken before someone becomes unhappy and decides to leave.

They can talk about what Michael needs to keep him engaged during this semester and then look at returning to the work that he really CARES about.  Relationships also matter. Having a good working relationship with the person you report to, as well as your coworkers, can also affect your engagement at work.

What is one way that you can increase your level of engagement at work over the next month? Could this involve having a conversation with your colleague or supervisor?

Engagement is one of 13 factors that support psychological health and safety in the workplace. Learn more at:  MentalHealthCommission.ca/NationalStandard

For more resources for your workplace, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Developed in collaboration by Ottawa Public Health and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

With content adapted with permission from Mindful Employer Canada

And support from Bell Let's Talk.

Engagement Worksheet

Download Engagment Worksheet

Facilitator Notes:

Use this worksheet to encourage a discussion about Engagement. It is one of thirteen factors that have been shown to impact mental health of individuals in the workplace. Be sure to encourage discussion by being open to all answers and opinions from participants. Examples of possible discussion groups are: employees at a team meeting or lunch and learn, staff or management orientation, and union-member discussions.

Suggested materials:

laptop, speakers, projector and screen, flip charts and markers, whiteboard or chalkboard.

Suggested Process:

Watch the video once at www.haveTHATtalk.ca

Read definition of Engagement:

On the Agenda defines Engagement as present in a work environment where employees feel connected to their work and are motivated to do their job well.

Ask participants:

 1. Think of a time when you were especially engaged and about a time when you were not. What made          these situations different?

 2. Why is employee engagement so important in the workplace?

Watch the video again.

Ask participants:

 3. What could have been done differently in the scenario with Michael and the school principal?

 4. What are some strategies to help YOUR workplace boost overall employee Engagement?

 5. Write down different ways that YOU can boost your Engagement at work.

Balance

Are you wondering if your life is out of balance ?

Complete our balancing work and home quiz



Transcript

Think of your typical day. How many hours do you spend on work? With family and friends? Do you think you can contribute fully to all these areas of your life? What about your personal time?

Is YOUR workplace promoting work-life balance? Balance is present in a work environment when there is recognition of the need for balance between the demand of work, family, and personal life.

In addition to work, we often play a lot of different roles in our personal lives. Each of these roles has its own demands and requires our energy and attention. Maybe you are a parent, a caregiver to an aging parent, or you volunteer in your community. Even keeping up with tasks like laundry, dishes, cooking, staying active... all take up time and energy.

When workplaces value a healthy balance, employees tend to have higher morale, less stress and burnout, and miss less work days.

Given that workplaces can have varying demands depending on the time of year, or projects you are working on, what does a healthy balance look like? Let's look at an example.

This is Liliana. Liliana works at a high-tech firm, where work demands can change depending on how many contracts they get. Liliana has recently been working longer hours at the office to meet a deadline.  She is becoming frustrated working longer hours than normal and not having as much time at home. Liliana is expected to meet the project deadline, but also knows her family is neglected... How can she balance these demands and how can Liliana's work help?

Liliana can talk to her family about the deadline she has and that sometimes her workload changes, but it is not a regular expectation. She may have to work more right now, but once this deadline is met, her hours will go back to normal. After speaking with her family, Liliana can discuss with her supervisor that she needs to be home for some family meals, events, and at least an hour before her kids' bedtime. She can ask her supervisor for help in managing the remaining tasks so she can have some work-life balance. They can discuss what tasks are a top priority. Or maybe extend the deadline to allow for more realistic time management. Perhaps there is an opportunity to work from home. Or maybe take some vacation time once the deadline has passed.

Other ways workplaces may support balance include:

  • Offering flexible working arrangements, such as compressed work schedules, working from home, or job sharing
  • Encourage management to not say that everything is "urgent"
  • Encouraging employees to take their allowed breaks such as lunch and coffee breaks
  • Encouraging employees to take their vacation leave and time off they have earned (or are given)
  • Making sure that overtime is not an every-day thing, but just needed under tight deadlines
  • Have on-site or nearby fitness facilities, get outside and use walking trails or do activities that can be done from their work area
  • Support staff to share accomplishments that are non-work related

Work-life balance is different for everyone. It's important to know what this means to you and to have a conversation with your supervisor.

How will you improve your work-life balance in the next week?

Balance is one of 13 factors that support psychological health and safety in the workplace. Learn more at:  MentalHealthCommission.ca/NationalStandard(link is external)

For more resources for your workplace, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Developed in collaboration by Ottawa Public Health and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

With content adapted with permission from Mindful Employer Canada

And support from Bell Let's Talk. 

 

Balance Worksheet

Download Balance Worksheet

Facilitator Notes:

Use this worksheet to encourage a discussion about Balance. It is one of thirteen factors that have been shown to impact mental health of individuals in the workplace. Be sure to encourage discussion by being open to all answers and opinions from participants. Examples of possible discussion groups are: employees at a team meeting or lunch and learn, staff or management orientation, and union-member discussions.

Suggested materials:

laptop, speakers, projector and screen, flip charts and markers, whiteboard or chalkboard.

Suggested Process:

Watch the video once at www.haveTHATtalk.ca

Read definition of Balance:

On the Agenda defines Balance as present in a work environment where there is recognition of the need for balance between the demands of work, family, and personal life.

 Ask participants:

 1. Think of a time when you had difficulty maintaining work life Balance. What strategies did you use, or could have used to manage during this time?

 2. Why is work life Balance so important?

Watch the video again.

Ask participants:

 3. What could have been done differently in the scenario with Liliana?

 4. What are some strategies to help YOUR workplace boost overall employee Balance?

 5. Write down different ways that YOU can manage your work life Balance.

Psychological protection 

Transcript

Have you ever had to report a problem to your supervisor at work? What about when you made a mistake? Or even when you wanted to bring up something that you weren't sure would be a popular opinion? What about a time when you felt burnt out at work? Did you feel safe bringing this up? Were you ever afraid that this might affect your job in a negative way?

Does YOUR employer encourage or even appreciate workers who speak up? A workplace where you feel safe sharing ideas or asking questions, without being afraid that something bad may happen is a workplace that models good PSYCHOLOGICAL PROTECTION. Workplaces that value psychological protection value their workers' emotional well-being.

A lot of times, we think of safety as a concept limited to PHYSICAL risks. This could be working with chemicals, in dangerous or high risk environments, or around infectious diseases. Safety isn't always just about what might hurt your BODY, but also what might hurt your MIND. There are situations at work that can be harmful or unsafe for your mental health. Let's look at an example.

This is Deepak. Deepak is not having a great time at work lately. Deepak is a creative thinker and usually has some big ideas. He feels that his suggestions are often brushed aside. He is not sure if that is because of the quality of his ideas or that his supervisor just doesn't want input from the team. Deepak is even staring to think that sharing ideas might be putting his job at risk. He no longer feels safe. What could Deepak's workplace do to make sure that he feels psychologically protected?

Although not everyone may feel comfortable doing so, it's important that we all speak up. It's also important for managers to encourage an environment where workers feel safe to speak up and be heard. Managers can also be the ones to approach workers and ask for their opinions. Allowing employees to contribute positive solutions and ideas leads to reduced conflict, fewer job-related errors, accidents or injuries, better compliance to rules and regulations, and reduced bullying and harassment.

Having processes, policies, and an organizational culture that encourages worker input and feedback is essential. It ensures that workers are contributing to their maximum potential and feel energized in their work. Leaders have a responsibility to promote, model, and reinforce these practices.

Workplace culture makes a big difference in how safe people feel. Embrace new ideas. See discussions as moments of learning, sharing, and collaboration. Embrace mistakes- that's how we learn! Have opportunities for workers to have open and confidential chats with their supervisors. A culture of sharing can be embedded in your daily workplace environment, such as during meetings, while working toward project concepts, or even when working through deadlines.

After watching this video, make a list of the things your workplace does to keep you psychologically protected. What's one thing you can do to make your workplace feel even safer?

Psychological protection is one of 13 factors that support psychological health and safety in the workplace Learn more at:  MentalHealthCommission.ca/NationalStandard

For more resources for your workplace, check out haveTHATtalk.ca.

Developed in collaboration by Ottawa Public Health and the Mental Health Commission of Canada. With content adapted with permission from Mindful Employer Canada...And support from Bell Let's Talk.

Psychological Protection Worksheet

Download Psychological Protection Worksheet

Facilitator Notes:

Use this worksheet to encourage a discussion about Psychological Protection. It is one of thirteen factors that have been shown to impact mental health of individuals in the workplace. Be sure to encourage discussion by being open to all answers and opinions from participants. Examples of possible discussion groups are: employees at a team meeting or lunch and learn, staff or management orientation, and union-member discussions.

Suggested materials:

laptop, speakers, projector and screen, flip charts and markers, whiteboard or chalkboard.

Suggested Process:

Watch the video once at www.haveTHATtalk.ca

Read definition of Psychological Protection:

On the Agenda defines Psychological Protection as present in a work environment where employees' psychological safety is ensured. Workplace psychological safety is demonstrated when workers feel able to safely ask questions, seek feedback, report mistakes and problems, or propose a new idea without fearing negative consequences to themselves, their jobs or their careers.

 Ask participants:

 1. Think of a time when you did not feel psychologically protected. How could you, or did you, address this feeling in a way that respected both you and the other party?

 2. What does a psychologically safe workplace look like? How can workplaces help support a psychologically safe workplace culture?

Watch the video again.

Ask participants:

 3. What could have been done differently in the scenario with Deepak and his manager?

 4. What are some strategies to help YOUR workplace ensure overall Psychological Protection?

 5. Write down different ways that YOU can ensure your own Psychological Protection at work.

Protection of physical safety

Transcript 

Think of your workplace. There are many parts of the PHYSICAL work space that can impact you. There can be some more obvious hazards that are part of your job. Do you work with machinery? With chemicals? Do you work outdoors? There can also be parts of your physical work that may affect you over a long period of time that might be harder to see. Do you work with computers? Around a lot of noise? Do you sit for long periods of time?

The truth is that ALL workplaces have physical hazards. It's how workplaces are PROACTIVE to address physical hazards that help employees feel safe. Workplaces that do this well offer good protection of physical safety. When you think about it, your physical work space doesn't only affect your body, but it could also affect your mental health. Working in a noisy environment could not only affect your hearing, but also your focus. Working with angry clients could affect your mental energy. Working with chemicals or machinery requires you to be alert.

Let's meet Ayesha. Ayesha is a new employee at a manufacturing company. Ayesha has a lot of past experience working in manufacturing... the big change for her is that her new company uses different technology than what she's used to. Ayesha's supervisor puts her to work the first day, with a very short orientation session. Her supervisor thinks that because of her past experience Ayesha should know how to operate the heavy machinery and protect herself from harm and risks associated with them. This makes Ayesha feel stressed and anxious. This is really NOT a healthy OR safe situation for Ayesha and she feels like she is putting herself at-risk of harm. She is hesitant about speaking to her new boss about this as it is her first day on the job. How can workplaces make sure their employees feel protected from physical harm?

In Ayesha's case, her new company would benefit from a standardized orientation training process. This would ensure that employees are aware of all of the risks - physical and psychological -associated with their jobs. They would then know the proper process to raise concerns, as and if they come up. A standardized process also ensures that everyone is on the same page... that they have been given the same knowledge. This is useful to ensure consistent use of physical equipment. More importantly, it enhances employee safety and productivity. Supervisors also need to check in with workers to ensure that they understand and apply to their job what they learned during training.

Some training is now required by provincial, territorial, and/or federal laws. Companies can also provide training to their staff about how their physical work space can affect their mental health. Letting employees know HOW TO report incidents, and also WHAT supports are available if an incident does occur can be reassuring for staff.

Depending on the workplace, the tools and environment can be changed to reduce risks or manage hazards to the employees. This could be as simple as installing proper lighting, reducing noise, having panic alarms, or increased ventilation.

Although a lot of the responsibility around employee safety is on the employer, everyone should play a role in physical safety at work. Employees also have a responsibility. If you notice anything that can cause harm in your workplace, be sure to tell your supervisor. Also, if you don't feel safe doing something at work, let your boss know if you'd benefit from any additional training.

After watching this video, list three ways that your workplace helps keep you physically safe. What is one area that your workplace can improve on? Speak about it with your supervisor this week.

Protection of Physical Safety is one of 13 factors that support psychological health and safety in the workplace. Learn more at:  MentalHealthCommission.ca/NationalStandard

For more resources for your workplace, check out haveTHATtalk.ca

Developed in collaboration by Ottawa Public Health and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

With content adapted with permission from Mindful Employer Canada

And support from Bell Let's Talk.

Protection of Physical Safety Worksheet

Download Protection of Physical Safety Worksheet

Facilitator Notes:

Use this worksheet to encourage a discussion about Protection of Physical Safety. It is one of thirteen factors that have been shown to impact mental health of individuals in the workplace. Be sure to encourage discussion by being open to all answers and opinions from participants. Examples of possible discussion groups are: employees at a team meeting or lunch and learn, staff or management orientation, and union-member discussions.

Suggested materials:

laptop, speakers, projector and screen, flip charts and markers, whiteboard or chalkboard.

Suggested Process:

Watch the video once at www.haveTHATtalk.ca

Read definition of Protection of Physical Safety:

On the Agenda defines Protection of Physical Safety as present in a work environment where management takes appropriate action to protect the physical safety of employees. Appropriate actions may include: policy to protect workers physical safety, training in safety-related protocols, rapid and appropriate response to physical accidents or unsafe situations, and clearly demonstrated concern for employees' physical safety.

Ask participants:

 1. Think of a time when you did not feel physically safe. How did you address this safety issue while respecting everyone involved?

 2. What does a physically safe workplace look like? What are some ways that employees can ensure their physical well being at work? How can workplaces make sure that their employees feel safe from physical harm at work?

Watch the video again.

Ask participants:

 3. What could have been done differently in the scenario with Ayesha and her supervisor?

 4. What are some strategies to help YOUR workplace ensure overall physical safety in the workplace?

 5. Write down different ways that YOU can ensure your own physical safety in the workplace.

Facilitator's Guide

The end of each video encourages the viewer to come up with an action plan to address that factor in their workplace. A worksheet has been created for each video. The worksheets are a tool that the facilitator can use to have an open discussion about the factor. A facilitator could be anyone in the workplace. Examples of facilitators are wellness professionals, HR professionals, supervisors, organizational leaders, union representatives or employees, etc. The role of a facilitator is to get a group together to discuss each factor.

Download Facilitator's Guide

Resources 

Do you want to address mental health in your workplace? Are you unsure of where to start?  Have you already started to implement the National Standard, but are not sure what your next step should be? 

Where to Get Started

If you are planning on implementing the National Standard be sure to check out these resources to help you get started:

  • The National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace
    The Standard is a voluntary set of guidelines, tools and resources focused on promoting employees' psychological health and preventing psychological harm due to workplace factors.1
  • Assembling the Pieces: An implementation guide to the national standard for psychological health and safety in the workplace
    This is a step-by-step resource for the Standard. It is geared toward senior leaders, human resource managers, and occupational health and safety professionals. It offers a roadmap to implementation of the Standard.2
  • The Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC)/Workplace
    The Mental Health Strategy for Canada encourages all employers to create and maintain mentally healthy workplaces. The MHCC is committed to helping them do that, by providing tools, information, and support. This is to ensure that every Canadian can go to work knowing their workplace recognizes the importance of psychological health and safety in the workplace.3
  • Guarding Minds at Work
    Guarding Minds @ Work (GM@W) is a unique and free set of resources designed to protect and promote psychological health and safety in the workplace. GM@W resources allow employers to effectively assess and address the 13 psychosocial factors. These factors are known to have a powerful impact on organizational health, the health of workers, and the bottom line.4
  • Assessment Resources (through GM@W)
    This is a great place to get started when assessing your workplace. There are free surveys that workplaces can use with workers and management to see how the workplace is doing in regards to each of the 13 factors. The employee survey is anonymous and the workplace will receive a report on the results!
  • Psychological Health and Safety Management System
    The implementation of a Psychological Health and Safety Management System is not about assessing an individual employee's mental health. It is about considering the impact of workplace processes, policies and interactions on the psychological health and safety of all employees.5
  • On the Agenda
    On the Agenda is a series of videos, presentation slides and supporting materials that can assist trainers, team leaders, managers or others to facilitate discussions aimed at developing a psychologically healthy and safe workplace.6
  • Mindful Employer Canada
    Mindful Employer Canada can help workplaces work towards the National Standard. Find out how by visiting their website.

Ready for Action!

There are many great resources that are available once you are ready for action!  Do you want to work on mental health in your workplace but you're not sure how?  These resources can help!

  • GM@W Action Resources
    These resources contain lists of suggested actions you can take in order to respond to areas of concern related to each of the 13 factors. Many of these actions have been effective in research studies, recommended as best practices or have been found valuable in applied settings.
  • Psychological Health and Safety Management System: Implementation
    This resource goes through the importance of starting the conversation in your workplace to highlighting specific resources that can help with each of the 13 factors.
  • Workplace Strategies for Mental Health
    Improve psychological health and safety in your workplace. This website has free tools and resources developed to build awareness and promote mental health. Support employee success. All tools and resources are free. Use them to help make a difference.7
    • Managing Mental Health Matters
      Managing Mental Health Matters (MMHM) is a "first of its kind" program focused on helping managers, supervisors and other leaders learn how to effectively recognize and manage mental health related issues in the workplace. MMHMs uses a story-based approach, portraying realistic episodes of workplace "characters" dealing with situations common to everyday work life.8
    • Take Your Break
      Subscribe to weekly TakeYourBreak emails for practical and engaging break time activities that focus on improving mental health at work.9
  • Working Through It
    When someone is struggling with a mental health issue, you may be concerned about invading privacy or being seen as harassing. Working Through It provides practical coping strategies, through videos and related resources, that can be used by individuals at work, off work and when returning to work.10
References
  1. Mental Health Commission of Canada. Topics: National Standard [Internet]. Ottawa, (ON). National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace; 2015 [cited 2015 Dec 21]; [about 2 screens]; available from: http://www.mentalhealthcommission.ca/English/issues/workplace/national-standard
  2. Mental Health Commission of Canada. Topics: National Standard [Internet]. Ottawa, (ON). Assembling the Pieces: An implementation guide to the national standard for psychological health and safety in the workplace; 2015 [cited 2015 Dec 21]; [about 2 screens]; available from: http://www.mentalhealthcommission.ca/English/issues/workplace/national-standard
  3. Mental Health Commission of Canada. Topics: Workplace [Internet]. Ottawa, (ON). Workplace; 2015 [cited 2015 Dec 21]; [about 2 screens]; available from: http://www.mentalhealthcommission.ca/English/issues/workplace
  4. Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction. Commissioned by Great West Life Centre for Mental Health in the Workplace, and funded by Great West Life Assurance Company. Hamilton, (ON). Guarding Minds @ Work: A workplace guide to psychological health & safety [Internet]; 2012 [cited 2015 Dec 21]; available from: http://www.guardingmindsatwork.ca/
  5. Great West Life Centre for Mental Health in the Workplace. Workplace Strategies for Mental Health: Psychological health and safety management system [Internet]. Winnipeg, (MB). 2015. [cited 2015 Dec 21]; available from: https://www.workplacestrategiesformentalhealth.com/Psychological-Health-and-Safety/Psychological-Health-and-Safety-Management-System
  6. Great West Life Centre for Mental Health in the Workplace. Workplace Strategies for Mental Health: On the agenda [Internet]. Winnipeg, (MB). 2015. [cited 2015 Dec 21]; available from: https://www.workplacestrategiesformentalhealth.com/Free-Training-and-Tools/On-the-Agenda
  7. Great West Life Centre for Mental Health in the Workplace. Workplace Strategies for Mental Health [Internet]. Winnipeg, (MB). 2015. [cited 2015 Dec 21]; available from: https://www.workplacestrategiesformentalhealth.com/
  8. Great West Life Centre for Mental Health in the Workplace. Workplace Strategies for Mental Health: Managing mental health matters [Internet]. Winnipeg, (MB). 2015. [cited 2015 Dec 21]; available from: http://www.workplacestrategiesformentalhealth.com/mmhm/
  9. Great West Life Centre for Mental Health in the Workplace. Workplace Strategies for Mental Health: Take your break [Internet]. Winnipeg, (MB). 2015. [cited 2015 Dec 21]; available from: https://www.workplacestrategiesformentalhealth.com/newsletter/Healthy-Break-Activities
  10. Great West Life Centre for Mental Health in the Workplace. Workplace Strategies for Mental Health: Working through it: a leader's guide [Internet]. Winnipeg, (MB). 2015. [cited 2015 Dec 21]; available from: https://www.workplacestrategiesformentalhealth.com/pdf/WTI_LeadersGuide.pdf 

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