Use legally

Cannabis use is now legal in Canada. Know how cannabis affects you. Only use legally and responsibly.

Individuals 19 and older can buy cannabis from the online Ontario Cannabis Store. There are restrictions to where you can use, how much you can have in public and grow at home, and restrictions to driving after consuming cannabis. Check out the information below to make sure you are using legally.

What is the legal age to buy cannabis?
You must be 19 and older to buy, use, possess and grow non-medical cannabis. This is the same as the minimum age for the sale of tobacco and alcohol in Ontario.
It is illegal to share cannabis with anyone who is under 19 years of age
Where can I buy cannabis?
The online Ontario Cannabis Store is the only legal option for purchasing non-medical cannabis. You can be confident that the cannabis you choose has been tested for safety and has accurate THC levels.

The Government of Ontario has also introduced legislation that, if passed, would allow privately run stores to sell cannabis as of April 1, 2019. The stores would be licensed by the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario and supplied by the Government of Ontario. 

Where can I use cannabis?
The Ontario government prohibits smoking or vaping cannabis in:
  • Enclosed public places, such as inside businesses, hospitals, restaurants and apartment building hallways
  • Enclosed workplaces
  • Common areas of buildings, such as hallways, laundry rooms and entertainment rooms
  • Schools and school grounds
  • Hospital grounds
  • Near child care centres
  • Restaurants, bars and patios

Aside from the public places previously listed, smoking and vaping of cannabis is permitted in some outdoor public places.  A complete list of smoke-free and vape-free spaces is available here. Landlords, condominium boards and co-operative housing boards may place additional restrictions on cannabis use. Check what rules apply to your residence.

The Government of Ontario prohibits consuming any form of cannabis in a vehicle or boat, whether the person is a driver or passenger.

The City of Ottawa Parks and Facilities By-law prohibits the smoking and vaping of tobacco and non-tobacco substances, including cannabis, on City property, such as City parks, arenas, recreational centers, libraries and pools.

If you choose to use in public, be mindful of others. Exposure to cannabis second-hand smoke can be harmful, especially for children, pregnant women, older adults, and people with respiratory problems. If possible, keep your home smoke and vape-free.

For more information: Smoke-Free Ontario Act, 2017

How much cannabis can I have in public?
You can have a maximum of 30 grams (about one ounce) of dried cannabis or the equivalent in other forms in public at any time.
Can I grow cannabis at home?

You can grow up to four plants per residence (not per person). Landlords, condominium boards and co-operative housing boards may place restrictions on growing cannabis. Check what rules apply to your residence. If you are a tenant with concerns, please notify your landlord in writing and contact 3-1-1 as needed.  

Growing at home can cause health and safety risks in your home, including:

  • Accidental consumption or poisoning
  • Compromised indoor air quality due to high humidity levels, odour, and carbon monoxide
  • Exposure to pesticides
  • Electrical and fire hazards

If you are growing cannabis at home, follow these environmental health and safety tips.

Additional resources:

What are the laws for driving after using cannabis?
If you are 21 or under, a novice driver, or a commercial driver, there is a zero tolerance law for impaired driving, meaning you cannot have any cannabis in your system.

If you are planning to use cannabis, plan a safe ride with a sober friend, use OC transpo, LyftUber, or a taxi

For more information visit:

Know where to go for help 

Signs you may need help with your cannabis or other drug use:

  • Ignoring responsibilities at work, school, or home.
  • Giving up activities that you find important or enjoyable.
  • Using more often.
  • Feeling unable to cut down or control use.
  • Changes in mood (e.g., feeling irritable and paranoid).
  • Changing friends.
  • Having difficulties with family members.
  • Being secretive or dishonest.
  • Changing sleep habits, appetite, or other behaviors.

If you are concerned about yourself or someone else, there are places where you can turn to for help.

Learn more about additional local mental health and addiction services.

 

 

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