Injuries and Injury Prevention

Injury and Injury Prevention Data

Injury is one of the leading causes of premature death and disability in Ottawa. In 2014, 18% of Ottawa residents aged 12 years and older reported being injured in the past year. [1] Many factors often come into play when injuries occur:

  • environmental influences such as the design of everyday objects and structures,
  • the use of protective equipment,
  • underlying social factors or other intrinsic factors such as age, sex, substance use, health and fitness.

Most injuries are not “accidents” because they are preventable. Yet the prevention of injuries is far from straightforward. Injury prevention strategies often consist of multifaceted efforts that address behaviours, policy and environment, the social determinants of health, and involve multiple sectors.

For more information on injury prevention and safety, please refer to Ottawa Public Health's Injury Prevention and Safety webpage.

Leading Causes of Injury Deaths

In Ottawa:

  • In 2012, there were 319 injury deaths, representing 6% of all deaths. [2]
  • The top three causes of injury deaths were falls, suicide, and unintentional poisonings and overdose. [2]
  • In the past 10 years there have been changes in the pattern of the leading causes of injury deaths (counts and rates). Falls became the leading cause of injury-related death in 2008, surpassing suicide. [2] The number and rate of deaths related to unintentional poisonings and drug overdose rose from 2008 to 2012 (Figure 1).
  • The increase in fall-related deaths and death rates occurred primarily among older adults (80 years of age and older). [2]

Figure 1. The top three leading causes of injury death for Ottawa residents, all ages, from 2000 to 2012 

Line chart presenting the number of deaths for the top three leading causes of injury deaths for Ottawa residents, all ages, from 2000 to 2012.

 Data Source and Notes for Figure 1

Ontario Mortality Data (2000-2012). Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHealth Ontario. Falls [ICD-10-CA W00-W19]; Suicide [ICD-10-CA X60-X84, Y87.0]; Unintentional poisonings/overdose [ICD-10-CA X40-X49].

  • The data represent deaths for Ottawa residents. The injury event leading to death may have taken place outside of Ottawa.

 Data Table for Figure 1

Table 1. Number of deaths due to the top three leading causes of injury deaths for Ottawa residents, all ages, from 2000 to 2012

Year

Falls Deaths

Suicides

Unintentional Poisonings/ Overdose Deaths

2000

39

55

17

2001

33

70

15

2002

45

43

21

2003

61

38

17

2004

53

56

19

2005

64

55

22

2006

62

65

21

2007

61

65

23

2008

80

69

20

2009

95

63

28

2010

110

65

34

2011

104

72

37

2012

132

63

34

Leading Causes of Injury-related Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations

In Ottawa:

  • Unintentional and intentional injuries to residents accounted for over 92,200 emergency department (ED) visits in 2017. Approximately 6,600 of these visits were hospitalized. [3]
  • Falls were the leading cause of injury-related ED visits (28,367) (Figure 2), hospitalizations (2,749) (Figure 3), and deaths (132). [2,3]
  • Falls were the leading cause of injury-related hospitalization in all age groups, with the exception of 15 to 24 year olds (Table 4). Self-harm was the leading cause of injury-related hospitalization for 15 to 24 year olds. [3]

Figure 2. Leading causes of injury-related emergency department visits for Ottawa residents, all ages, 2017

 Horizontal bar chart of the leading causes of injury-related emergency department visits for Ottawa residents, all ages, in 2017

Data Source and Notes for Figure 2

Unscheduled emergency department visits, National Ambulatory Care System (2017). Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHealth Ontario. Extracted June 8, 2018.

  • MVTC = Motor vehicle traffic collisions.
  • Not all categories are mutually exclusive and unless stated, some of the injury categories (e.g. cycling, falls, drowning) may overlap with the sport & recreation category.
  • The counts provided include all Ottawa residents seen at emergency departments (ED) and subsequently hospitalized in Ontario. Please note that injury events may have taken place outside of Ottawa.
  • The approach to reporting leading causes of injury here is different from the way others have reported the leading causes of injury.

    • It includes a sport and recreational injury category, utilizing Canadian-specific U99 activity codes for ED and hospitalization data, which are not mandatory in the hierarchy of coding sport and recreational injuries. The U99 activity codes are suggested for use in describing further, the activity of the injured person at the time the event occurred. For example, a person who fell while playing ice hockey would be coded as W00 (Fall on same level involving ice and snow) and U99.011 (Ice hockey). While we have used the U99 codes to tease out sport and recreation specific codes from categories where there is common (>5%) overlap (i.e., falls, overexertion), the categories are not all mutually exclusive. For example, a person who was bitten by a dog and fell while out for a run would be coded as W54 (Bitten or struck by dog), W01 (Fall on same level from slipping, tripping and stumbling) and U99.050 (Running) and would be counted in the sport and recreation and the natural environment categories, but would not be included in the falls, non-sports category.

    • Another difference is that others have defined MVTC as a broader category, whereas we have separate categories for car/van/truck/motorcyclist occupants, pedestrians, public transit/bus/train occupants and cyclists injured in a transport collision.

    • Due to these differences, the rankings should not be compared to other rankings of leading causes of injury morbidity and mortality.

  • The following ICD-10-CA codes were used to categorize the injuries:
ICD-10-CA Codes for External Causes of Injuries

External Cause of Injury

ICD10-CA

All Unintentional Injuries

V01-X59, Y85-Y86. Emergency department and hospitalizations with a code of W75-W84 not accompanied by a main diagnosis of ICD-10-CA S or T are excluded.

Burns

X00-X19, W85-W93

Choking or suffocation

W75-W84 accompanied by a main diagnosis of ICD-10-CA S or T

Cut/pierce

W25-W29, W45-W46

Drowning/near drowning

W65-W74, V90, V92

Falls

W00-W19

Foreign body entering the eye or other orifice

W44

Motor vehicle traffic collisions, car/van/truck/motorcyclist occupant

V20-V69, V83-V85

Natural environment – bitten by animals, reptiles, insects, plants, forces of nature, heat, cold, noise/vibration

W53-W64, W92-W99, W42, W43, W20-39, X51-X57

Overexertion, non-sports

X50. Emergency department visits and hospitalizations accompanied with a code of U99.00-U99.09 are excluded.

Pedestrian

V01-V09

Poisoning/overdose (unintentional)

X40-X49

Public transit (bus, train, streetcar)

V70-V79, V81-V82

Sport and recreational activities

Includes ICD10-CA Chapter XX codes for ATV or snowmobile, baseball, cycling, rollerskate, scooter or skateboard, football or rugby, hockey/ringette, ice skating, playground, including trampoline, pool & natural water swimming, diving/jumping, recreational boating, ski or snowboarding, soccer, tobogganing and all activities coded as U99.00-U99.09 accompanied with a main diagnosis in Chapter XIX (S or T codes) and an unintentional injury code (V01-X59, Y85-Y86).

ATV or Snowmobile

V68, U99.032a, U99.045a

Baseball

W22.05, W21.01, W51.05, U99.010a

Cycling

V10-V19, U99.034a, U99.035a

Rollerskate, scooter or skateboard

W02.02, W02.03, W02.08, U99.036a

Football or rugby

W22.03, W51.03, U99.003 a, U99.004a

Hockey/Ringette

W21.02, W21.03, W22.02, W51.02, U99.011a, U99.012a, U99.013a, U99.014a, U99.016a

Ice skating

W02.00, U99.041a

Playground (excluding trampoline)

W09.0-W09.4, W09.6-W09.9

Toboggan

W22.01, W51.01, U99.043a

Trampoline

W09.05, U99.062a

Pool & natural water swimming, diving/jumping

W16, W67-W74, U99.020a, U99.021a, U99.024, U99.025a, U99.028a, U99.029a

Recreational boating

V90.2-V90.8, V91.2-V91.8, V92.2-V92.9, U99.022a, U99.030a, U99.031a, U99.085a

Ski or snowboard

W02.01, W02.04, W22.00, W51.00, U99.040a, U99.044a

Soccer

W22.04, W51.04, U99.002a

Struck/bumped by object/person, non-sports

W20.00, W22.08, W22.09, W50.00, W51.08, W51.09, W52

Intentional injuries

 

Self-harm

X60-X84, Y87.0

Assault

X85-X99, Y00-Y09, Y87.1

 “U” codes included only if accompanied with a “S” or “T” code from Chapter XIX. U codes were available for ER visits and hospitalizations only.

Data Table for Figure 2

Table 2. Leading causes of injury-related emergency department visits for Ottawa residents, all ages, 2017

Injury Type

Number of Emergency Department Visits

Falls

28367

Sports & recreation

11898

Struck/bumped by object/person, non-sports

7643

Cut/pierce

6152

Overexertion

5802

Natural environment

3836

MVTC occupant/motorcyclist

3182

Foreign body in eye/orifice

2513

Assault

1978

Cycling

1619

Unintentional poisonings

1465

Self-harm

1270

Burns

872

Pedestrian

407

Public transit

237

Choking or suffocation

106

Non-fatal and fatal drowning

28

Figure 3. Leading causes of injury-related hospitalizations for Ottawa residents, all ages, 2017

 Horizontal bar chart of the leading causes of injury-related hospitalizations for Ottawa residents, all ages, in 2017

Data Source and Notes for Figure 3

Hospitalizations resulting from unscheduled emergency department visits, National Ambulatory Care System (2017). Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHealth Ontario. Extracted June 8, 2018

  • MVTC = Motor vehicle traffic collisions.
  • Not all categories are mutually exclusive and unless stated, some of the injury categories (e.g. cycling, falls, drowning) may overlap with the sport & recreation category.
  • The approach to reporting leading causes of injury here is different from the way others have reported the leading causes of injury.
    • It includes a sport and recreational injury category, utilizing Canadian-specific U99 activity codes for ED and hospitalization data, which are not mandatory in the hierarchy of coding sport and recreational injuries. The U99 activity codes are suggested for use in describing further, the activity of the injured person at the time the event occurred. For example, a person who fell while playing ice hockey would be coded as W00 (Fall on same level involving ice and snow) and U99.011 (Ice hockey). While we have used the U99 codes to tease out sport and recreation specific codes from categories where there is common (>5%) overlap (i.e., falls, overexertion), the categories are not all mutually exclusive. For example, a person who was bitten by a dog and fell while out for a run would be coded as W54 (Bitten or struck by dog), W01 (Fall on same level from slipping, tripping and stumbling) and U99.050 (Running) and would be counted in the sport and recreation and the natural environment categories, but would not be included in the falls, non-sports category.
    • Another difference is that others have defined MVTC as a broader category, whereas we have separate categories for car/van/truck/motorcyclist occupants, pedestrians, public transit/bus/train occupants and cyclists injured in a transport collision.
    • Due to these differences, the rankings should not be compared to other rankings of leading causes of injury morbidity and mortality.
  • The following ICD-10-CA codes were used to categorize the injuries:
ICD-10-CA Codes for External Causes of Injuries

External Cause of Injury

ICD10-CA

All Unintentional Injuries

V01-X59, Y85-Y86. Emergency department and hospitalizations with a code of W75-W84 not accompanied by a main diagnosis of ICD-10-CA S or T are excluded.

Burns

X00-X19, W85-W93

Choking or suffocation

W75-W84 accompanied by a main diagnosis of ICD-10-CA S or T

Cut/pierce

W25-W29, W45-W46

Drowning/near drowning

W65-W74, V90, V92

Falls

W00-W19

Foreign body entering the eye or other orifice

W44

Motor vehicle traffic collisions, car/van/truck/motorcyclist occupant

V20-V69, V83-V85

Natural environment – bitten by animals, reptiles, insects, plants, forces of nature, heat, cold, noise/vibration

W53-W64, W92-W99, W42, W43, W20-39, X51-X57

Overexertion, non-sports

X50. Emergency department visits and hospitalizations accompanied with a code of U99.00-U99.09 are excluded.

Pedestrian

V01-V09

Poisoning/overdose (unintentional)

X40-X49

Public transit (bus, train, streetcar)

V70-V79, V81-V82

Sport and recreational activities

Includes ICD10-CA Chapter XX codes for ATV or snowmobile, baseball, cycling, rollerskate, scooter or skateboard, football or rugby, hockey/ringette, ice skating, playground, including trampoline, pool & natural water swimming, diving/jumping, recreational boating, ski or snowboarding, soccer, tobogganing and all activities coded as U99.00-U99.09 accompanied with a main diagnosis in Chapter XIX (S or T codes) and an unintentional injury code (V01-X59, Y85-Y86).

ATV or Snowmobile

V68, U99.032a, U99.045a

Baseball

W22.05, W21.01, W51.05, U99.010a

Cycling

V10-V19, U99.034a, U99.035a

Rollerskate, scooter or skateboard

W02.02, W02.03, W02.08, U99.036a

Football or rugby

W22.03, W51.03, U99.003 a, U99.004a

Hockey/Ringette

W21.02, W21.03, W22.02, W51.02, U99.011a, U99.012a, U99.013a, U99.014a, U99.016a

Ice skating

W02.00, U99.041a

Playground (excluding trampoline)

W09.0-W09.4, W09.6-W09.9

Toboggan

W22.01, W51.01, U99.043a

Trampoline

W09.05, U99.062a

Pool & natural water swimming, diving/jumping

W16, W67-W74, U99.020a, U99.021a, U99.024, U99.025a, U99.028a, U99.029a

Recreational boating

V90.2-V90.8, V91.2-V91.8, V92.2-V92.9, U99.022a, U99.030a, U99.031a, U99.085a

Ski or snowboard

W02.01, W02.04, W22.00, W51.00, U99.040a, U99.044a

Soccer

W22.04, W51.04, U99.002a

Struck/bumped by object/person, non-sports

W20.00, W22.08, W22.09, W50.00, W51.08, W51.09, W52

Intentional injuries

Self-harm

X60-X84, Y87.0

Assault

X85-X99, Y00-Y09, Y87.1

a “U” codes included only if accompanied with a “S” or “T” code from Chapter XIX. U codes were available for ER visits and hospitalizations only.

Data Table for Figure 3

Table 3. Leading causes of injury-related hospitalizations for Ottawa residents, all ages, 2017

Injury Type

Number of Hospitalizations

Falls

2749

Self-harm

429

Sports & recreation

286

MVTC occupant/motorcyclist

234

Unintentional poisonings

157

Assault

130

Cycling

93

Foreign body in eye/orifice

82

Overexertion

62

Cut/pierce

54

Pedestrian

48

Natural environment

43

Choking or suffocation

30

Burns

22

Non-fatal and fatal drowning

6

Table 4. Leading causes of injury-related hospitalizations, presented as counts with rates per 100,000 population in brackets, for Ottawa residents by age groups, 2017

Rank

0 to 4 Years Old

5 to 14 Years Old

15 to 24 Years Old

25 to 44 Years Old

45 to 64 Years Old

65+ Years Old

1

Falls

60 (113.0)

Falls

109 (104.1)

Self-harm

187 (143.1)

Falls

117 (40.3)

Falls

375 (140.5) 

Falls

2030 (1342.6) 

2

Sport & recreation

12 (22.6)

Sport & recreation

98 (93.6)

Falls

58 (44.4)

Self-harm

115 (39.6)

Self-harm

91 (34.1%)

MVTC, car/van/ truck/motorcycle occupant

57 (37.7)

3

Foreign body entering eye/orifice

10 (18.8)

Cycling

15 (14.3)

Sport & recreation

47 (36.0)

Assault

62 (21.4)

Sport & recreation

89 (33.3)

Struck/ bumped by object/person

37 (24.5)

4

Unintentional poisoning / overdose

8 (15.1) 

Self-harm

13 (12.4)

MVTC, car/van/ truck/motorcycle occupant

40 (30.6)

MVTC, car/van/ truck/motorcycle occupant

62 (21.4) 

MVTC, car/van/ truck/motorcycle occupant

73 (27.3)

Sport & recreation

32 (21.2)

5

Struck/ bumped by object/person

7 (13.2)

Foreign body entering eye/orifice

12 (11.5) 

Assault

39 (29.9)

Unintentional poisoning / overdose

45 (15.5)

Unintentional poisoning / overdose

42 (15.7)

Unintentional poisoning / overdose

28 (18.5)

Total

All injuries

142 (267.4)

All injuries

241 (230.3)

All injuries

533 (408.0)

All injuries

840 (289.5)

All injuries

1487 (557.1)

All injuries

3358 (2221.0)

Data Source and Notes for Table 4

Hospitalizations resulting from unscheduled emergency department visits, National Ambulatory Care System (2017). Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHealth Ontario. Extracted June 8, 2018. 

  • MVTC = Motor vehicle traffic collisions.
  • Not all categories are mutually exclusive and unless stated, some of the injury categories (e.g. cycling, falls, drowning) may overlap with the sport & recreation category.
  • The counts provided include all Ottawa residents seen at emergency departments and subsequently hospitalized in Ontario. Please note that injury events may have taken place outside of Ottawa.
  • The approach to reporting leading causes of injury here is different from the way others have reported the leading causes of injury.
    • It includes a sport and recreational injury category, utilizing Canadian-specific U99 activity codes for ED and hospitalization data, which are not mandatory in the hierarchy of coding sport and recreational injuries. The U99 activity codes are suggested for use in describing further, the activity of the injured person at the time the event occurred. For example, a person who fell while playing ice hockey would be coded as W00 (Fall on same level involving ice and snow) and U99.011 (Ice hockey). While we have used the U99 codes to tease out sport and recreation specific codes from categories where there is common (>5%) overlap (i.e., falls, overexertion), the categories are not all mutually exclusive. For example, a person who was bitten by a dog and fell while out for a run would be coded as W54 (Bitten or struck by dog), W01 (Fall on same level from slipping, tripping and stumbling) and U99.050 (Running) and would be counted in the sport and recreation and the natural environment categories, but would not be included in the falls, non-sports category.
    • Another difference is that others have defined MVTC as a broader category, whereas we have separate categories for car/van/truck/motorcyclist occupants, pedestrians, public transit/bus/train occupants and cyclists injured in a transport collision.
    • Due to these differences, the rankings should not be compared to other rankings of leading causes of injury morbidity and mortality.
  • The following ICD-10-CA codes were used to categorize the injuries:
ICD-10-CA Codes for External Causes of Injuries

External Cause of Injury

ICD10-CA

All Unintentional Injuries

V01-X59, Y85-Y86. Emergency department and hospitalizations with a code of W75-W84 not accompanied by a main diagnosis of ICD-10-CA S or T are excluded.

Burns

X00-X19, W85-W93

Choking or suffocation

W75-W84 accompanied by a main diagnosis of ICD-10-CA S or T

Cut/pierce

W25-W29, W45-W46

Drowning/near drowning

W65-W74, V90, V92

Falls

W00-W19

Foreign body entering the eye or other orifice

W44

Motor vehicle traffic collisions, car/van/truck/motorcyclist occupant

V20-V69, V83-V85

Natural environment – bitten by animals, reptiles, insects, plants, forces of nature, heat, cold, noise/vibration

W53-W64, W92-W99, W42, W43, W20-39, X51-X57

Overexertion, non-sports

X50. Emergency department visits and hospitalizations accompanied with a code of U99.00-U99.09 are excluded.

Pedestrian

V01-V09

Poisoning/overdose (unintentional)

X40-X49

Public transit (bus, train, streetcar)

V70-V79, V81-V82

Sport and recreational activities

Includes ICD10-CA Chapter XX codes for ATV or snowmobile, baseball, cycling, rollerskate, scooter or skateboard, football or rugby, hockey/ringette, ice skating, playground, including trampoline, pool & natural water swimming, diving/jumping, recreational boating, ski or snowboarding, soccer, tobogganing and all activities coded as U99.00-U99.09 accompanied with a main diagnosis in Chapter XIX (S or T codes) and an unintentional injury code (V01-X59, Y85-Y86).

ATV or Snowmobile

V68, U99.032a, U99.045a

Baseball

W22.05, W21.01, W51.05, U99.010a

Cycling

V10-V19, U99.034a, U99.035a

Rollerskate, scooter or skateboard

W02.02, W02.03, W02.08, U99.036a

Football or rugby

W22.03, W51.03, U99.003 a, U99.004a

Hockey/Ringette

W21.02, W21.03, W22.02, W51.02, U99.011a, U99.012a, U99.013a, U99.014a, U99.016a

Ice skating

W02.00, U99.041a

Playground (excluding trampoline)

W09.0-W09.4, W09.6-W09.9

Toboggan

W22.01, W51.01, U99.043a

Trampoline

W09.05, U99.062a

Pool & natural water swimming, diving/jumping

W16, W67-W74, U99.020a, U99.021a, U99.024, U99.025a, U99.028a, U99.029a

Recreational boating

V90.2-V90.8, V91.2-V91.8, V92.2-V92.9, U99.022a, U99.030a, U99.031a, U99.085a

Ski or snowboard

W02.01, W02.04, W22.00, W51.00, U99.040a, U99.044a

Soccer

W22.04, W51.04, U99.002a

Struck/bumped by object/person, non-sports

W20.00, W22.08, W22.09, W50.00, W51.08, W51.09, W52

Intentional injuries

Self-harm

X60-X84, Y87.0

Assault

X85-X99, Y00-Y09, Y87.1

a “U” codes included only if accompanied with a “S” or “T” code from Chapter XIX. U codes were available for ER visits and hospitalizations only.

Falls

Although falls are largely preventable, they represent a tremendous health and economic burden.

In Ottawa:

  • The highest rates of fall-related injury hospitalization are among older adults aged 65+ years. [3]
  • Every year, approximately one fifth of older adults who live in private homes fall. [4]
  • In 2017, there were:
    • Over 2,700 fall-related hospitalizations, most of which were among residents aged 65+ years (2,030 hospitalizations). [3]
    • Over 28,000 fall-related emergency department visits, including close to 9,000 visits among adults aged 65+ years. [3]

Road Safety

Seat belt Use

All Ontario motor vehicle drivers and passengers are required to wear a seat belt. Proper use of seat belts reduces the risk of death and serious injury in a collision.

Table 5.  Seat belt use in Ottawa and Ontario-less-Ottawa, 2013-14 and 2017

Indicator

Measure

Ottawa Data

Ontario-less-Ottawa Data

Data Source

Youth

% of students in Grades 7 to 12 who always wear a seat belt when in a vehicle

71%

 75%

2017 OSDUHS

Adult Drivers

% of drivers aged 16 years or older who always wear a seatbelt

98%

96%

2013-14 CCHS

Passengers

% of passengers aged 12 years or older who always wear a seatbelt

79%

82%

2013-14 CCHS

Taxi Passengers

% of taxi passengers aged 12 years or older who always wear a seatbelt

57%

61%

2013-14 CCHS

 Data Sources and Notes for Table 5

Ottawa Public Health. Public Health Monitoring of Risk Factors in Ontario – Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) (2017), Centre for Addiction & Mental Health.

  • The 2017 data used in this section are from the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey conducted by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and administered by the Institute for Social Research, York University. Its contents and interpretation are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.
  • The Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) is the longest ongoing biennial school survey in Canada, and the only province-wide survey of this population. The 2017 statistics are based on a random representative sample of over 1,400 Ottawa students enrolled in any of the four publicly funded school boards in Grades 7 through 12.

Ottawa Public Health. Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2013/14. Ontario Share File. Statistics Canada

  • The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) is an annual national population health survey conducted by Statistics Canada.

Impaired Driving

Alcohol, cannabis, over-the-counter and prescription medications, and other drugs can affect reaction time, judgement, coordination, and motor skills. These substances can impair driving and increase the risk of collision and injury.

Table 6.  Impaired driving behaviours in Ottawa and Ontario-less-Ottawa, 2013-14 and 2017

Indicator

Measure

Ottawa Data

Ontario-less-Ottawa Data

Data Source

Youth Passenger Drinking and Driving

% of students in Grades 7 to 12 who were passengers in a car (at least once in past year) driven by someone who had been drinking

16%

16%

2017 OSDUHS

Youth Passenger Drugs and Driving

% of students in Grades 7 to 12 who were passengers in a car (at least once in past year) driven by someone who had been using drugs other than alcohol

11%

10%

2017 OSDUHS

Youth Driver Cannabis Use

% of high school student drivers who drove within an hour of using cannabis

15%*

10%

2017 OSDUHS

Adult Drinking and Driving

% of drivers aged 16 years or older who had 2 or more drinks in the hour before driving (at least once in the past year)

4%*

4%

2013-14 CCHS

 

 Data Sources and Notes for Table 6

Ottawa Public Health. Public Health Monitoring of Risk Factors in Ontario – Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) (2017), Centre for Addiction & Mental Health.

  • The 2017 data used in this section are from the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey conducted by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and administered by the Institute for Social Research, York University. Its contents and interpretation are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.
  • The Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) is the longest ongoing biennial school survey in Canada, and the only province-wide survey of this population. The 2017 statistics are based on a random representative sample of over 1,400 Ottawa students enrolled in any of the four publicly funded school boards in grades 7 through 12.

Ottawa Public Health. Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2013/14. Ontario Share File. Statistics Canada

  • The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) is an annual national population health survey conducted by Statistics Canada

*Interpret with caution – high sampling variability

Distracted Driving

Distracted driving (e.g., texting or using a cell phone, eating or drinking, tending to a child or pet, searching for music) increases the risk of collision, injury, and death.

Table 7. Distracted driving behaviours in Ottawa and Ontario-less-Ottawa, 2013-14 and 2017

Indicator

Measure

Ottawa Data

Ontario-less-Ottawa Data

Data Source

Youth Texting

% high school student drivers who did not send or read a text message/email while driving in the past year

71%

65%

2017 OSDUHS

Adult Cell Phone Use

% of drivers aged 16 years or older who never used a cell phone (excluding hands free) when driving

71%

74%

2013-14 CCHS

Adult Hands Free Cell Phone Use

% of drivers aged 16 years or older who use hands-free cell phone often or sometimes while driving

31%

30%

2013-14 CCHS

 Data Sources and Notes for Table 7

Ottawa Public Health. Public Health Monitoring of Risk Factors in Ontario – Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) (2017), Centre for Addiction & Mental Health.

  • The 2017 data used in this section are from the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey conducted by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and administered by the Institute for Social Research, York University. Its contents and interpretation are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.
  • The OSDUHS is the longest ongoing biennial school survey in Canada, and the only province-wide survey of this population. The 2017 statistics are based on a random representative sample of over 1,400 Ottawa students enrolled in any of the four publicly funded school boards in grades 7 through 12.

Ottawa Public Health. Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2013/14. Ontario Share File. Statistics Canada

  • The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) is an annual national population health survey conducted by Statistics Canada

Violence Data

Violence is the intentional use of physical force or power, threatened or actual, against oneself, another person, or against a group or community, that either results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm, maldevelopment or deprivation. [5] Exposure to violence is linked to poor mental and physical health outcomes, fear, social isolation, and risky behaviours, including criminal behaviour. [6,7,8,9,10,11]

Local data sources for estimates of violence are lacking, and the limited data that is available may underrepresent the violence experienced by Ottawa residents. For more information about violence and it’s impact on health, refer to Status of Mental Health in Ottawa Report 2018 and The Chief Public Health Officer’s Report on the State of Public Health in Canada 2016: A Focus on Family Violence in Canada.

Family Violence

  • From provincial reports, one-third (32%) of Ontario adults reported experiencing physical abuse, sexual abuse or exposure to intimate partner violence as a child. [12]

  • Nationally, 8% of community-dwelling older adults (55 years and older) reported mistreatment, most commonly reporting psychological and financial abuse. [13]

  • In 2015, 29 per 100,000 Ottawa older adults (65 to 89 years of age) were victims of police reported family violence, which was lower than the rates in Ontario (including Ottawa; 48 per 100,000) and Canada (60 per 100,000). [14]

Bullying

  • In 2017, one in five Ottawa students in Grades 7 to 12 (18%) were bullied at least once on school property in the current school year. [15]
  • Verbal or non-physical attacks were reported by 81% of bullied students and cyberbullying (bullied on the internet) was reported by 18% of Ottawa students. [15]
  • Bullying others at school was reported by 8% of Ottawa students and cyberbullying others by 8% of students. [15]

Physical and Sexual Assault

  • In 2017, 5% of Ottawa students in Grades 7 to 12 reported they had beat up or hurt someone on purpose in the past 12 months, and 10% reported they had been in a physical fight on school property in the past 12 months. [15]
  • In 2016, Ottawa residents made 1,900 visits to the emergency department (ED) due to assault, which includes physical and sexual assault. These assault-related ED visits resulted in 169 hospitalizations. [16]
  • Approximately 4% of Ontario adults reported being the victim of a physical or sexual assault in the past year – this was highest among young adults aged 18 to 24 years (9%) and higher for those born in Canada (4%) than for immigrants (2%). [12]

Injury, Injury Prevention, and Violence Reports

 Results from the Older Adults Falls Prevention Survey

In 2012, OPH conducted the Older Adults Falls Prevention Survey by telephone with 1,050 Ottawa adults aged 65 years and older living at home. The fact sheets and infographics are intended to help service providers who work with older adults to tailor awareness and education campaigns on preventing falls, to support client education, and to inform program priorities and policy development. A description of OPH, partner and community falls prevention services are included at the end of each fact sheet.

Summary [ PDF 98 KB ]

Introduction [ PDF 101.81 KB ]

Annual Physical & Vision Exam and Medication Review

Falls Prevention Home Safety:

Perception of Falls Risk and Prevention:

Physical Activity:

Vitamin D and Calcium Intake:

Burden of Injury Report, 2010

The Burden of Injury in Ottawa report 2010 provides an in-depth assessment of the type and frequency of injuries affecting children, youth and adults in Ottawa. Data from emergency department visits (ED visits), hospitalizations and deaths from 2001 to 2008 help paint a picture of the injuries most affecting Ottawa residents.

Burden of Injury Report, 2010 [PDF 12 MB]

Burden of Injury Report: Knowledge to Action Report [PDF 886 KB]

References

References

  1. Ottawa Public Health. Canadian Community Health Survey Ontario Share File 2013/2014. Statistics Canada.
  2. Ottawa Public Health. Ottawa Deaths, Ontario Mortality Data 2000-2012. Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHEALTH Ontario. Extracted 2016.
  3. Ottawa Public Health. Emergency department visits and resulting hospitalization. National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS), 2017. Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHEALTH Ontario. Extracted June 2018.
  4. Ottawa Public Health. Rapid Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2015.
  5. World Health Organization. World report on violence and health: summary. 2002. 
  6. Norman RE, Byambaa M, De R, Butchart A, Scott J, Vos T. The long-term health consequences of child physical abuse, emotional abuse, and neglect: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS medicine. 2012;9(11):e1001349.
  7. Lagdon S, Armour C, Stringer M. Adult experience of mental health outcomes as a result of intimate partner violence victimisation: a systematic review. European Journal of Psychotraumatology. 2014;5(1):24794.
  8. Violence and Injury Prevention Program WROfE. The cycles of violence: The relationship between childhood maltreatment and the risk of later becoming a victim or perpetrator of violence: Key facts. Rome, Italy; 2007.
  9. Public Health Agency of Canada. The Chief Public Health Officer's report on the state of public health in Canada 2016: A Focus on family violence in Canada. Ottawa, ON; 2016 2016.
  10. Irish L, Kobayashi I, Delahanty DL. Long-term Physical Health Consequences of Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Meta-Analytic Review. Journal of Pediatric Psychology. 2010;35(5):450-61.
  11. Leber B. Police-reported hate crime in Canada, 2015. Statistics Canada; 2017.

  12. Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention, Public Health Agency of Canada (2016). Postive Mental Health Surveillance Indicator Framework, Public Health Infobase
  13. McDonald L. Into the light: National survey on the mistreatment of older Canadians 2015.
  14. Burczycka M, Conroy S. Family violence in Canada: A statisitical profile, 2015. Statistics Canada; 2017 February 16, 2017.
  15. Otawa Public Health. Public Health Monitoring of Risk Factors in Ontario – Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) (2017), Centre for Addiction & Mental Health.

  16. Ottawa Public Health. Emergency department visits and resulting hospitalization. National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS), 2016. Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care IntelliHEALTH Ontario. Extracted 2017.

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